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8-16 A Section

August 15, 2014

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By Amanda Corbin
PDN Reporter
“Both buildings could
become unusable in the future
if something isn’t done,” said
Wister Public Schools Super-
intendent Jerry Carpenter.
“We need [these buildings]
desperately.”
The Wister Board of Edu-
cation has proposed a $500,000
bond issue to district voters to
be voted on in the Aug. 26
election.
Only those within the Wis-
ter School District can vote.
According to Carpenter, if
the bond passes, the school’s
top priority is the vocational
agricultural building’s reno-
vation and expansion, which
is expected to cost $300,000
and could be completed in a
year. The building has metal
siding issues such as rusting
and the roof is worn and leak-
ing in places.
The building houses weld-
ers and a classroom the dis-
trict would like to expand.
The district has grown from
369 students at the end of the
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966 918-473-3700
2501 Market Trace Toll Free 1-877-473-3700
Ft. Smith, AR Hwy 266 W. Checotah, OK
8 - 5 pm Monday - Friday
We accept and fle most insurances!
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Thomas John Kennedy of Arkansas, DDS, PLLC and Associates • General Dentistry
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Thomas John Kennedy of Arkansas, DDS, PLLC and Associates • General Dentistry
One Day Dentures
WE OFFER MORE THAn juST dEnTuRES
REplACEMEnT dEnTuRES
iMMEdiATE & pARTiAl dEnTuRES • ExTRACTiOnS
dEnTAl iMplAnTS • TEETH WHiTEning
CROWn & bRidgE • pluS MuCH MORE
all at a fraction of the cost!!
Thomas John Kennedy of AR, DDS, PLLC, General Dentistry
Dr. C. Brant Crisp, Dr. Heath Coleman, Dr. Jim Curlin
in Arkansas
Thomas John Kennedy of OK, DDS, PLLC, General Dentistry
Dr. Heath Coleman, Dr. Allen Summerlin, Dr. Mike Willbanks
in Oklahoma
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966 918-473-3700
2501 Market Trace Toll Free 1-877-473-3700
Ft. Smith, AR Hwy 266 W. Checotah, OK
8 - 5 pm Monday - Friday
We accept and fle most insurances!
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Thomas John Kennedy of Arkansas, DDS, PLLC and Associates • General Dentistry
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Thomas John Kennedy of Arkansas, DDS, PLLC and Associates • General Dentistry
One Day Dentures
WE OFFER MORE THAn juST dEnTuRES
REplACEMEnT dEnTuRES
iMMEdiATE & pARTiAl dEnTuRES • ExTRACTiOnS
dEnTAl iMplAnTS • TEETH WHiTEning
CROWn & bRidgE • pluS MuCH MORE
all at a fraction of the cost!!
Thomas John Kennedy of AR, DDS, PLLC, General Dentistry
Dr. C. Brant Crisp, Dr. Heath Coleman, Dr. Jim Curlin
in Arkansas
Thomas John Kennedy of OK, DDS, PLLC, General Dentistry
Dr. Heath Coleman, Dr. Allen Summerlin, Dr. Mike Willbanks
in Oklahoma
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966 918-473-3700
2501 Market Trace Toll Free 1-877-473-3700
Ft. Smith, AR Hwy 266 W. Checotah, OK
8 - 5 pm Monday - Friday
We accept and fle most insurances!
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Thomas John Kennedy of Arkansas, DDS, PLLC and Associates • General Dentistry
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Thomas John Kennedy of Arkansas, DDS, PLLC and Associates • General Dentistry
One Day Dentures
WE OFFER MORE THAn juST dEnTuRES
REplACEMEnT dEnTuRES
iMMEdiATE & pARTiAl dEnTuRES • ExTRACTiOnS
dEnTAl iMplAnTS • TEETH WHiTEning
CROWn & bRidgE • pluS MuCH MORE
all at a fraction of the cost!!
Thomas John Kennedy of AR, DDS, PLLC, General Dentistry
Dr. C. Brant Crisp, Dr. Heath Coleman, Dr. Jim Curlin
in Arkansas
Thomas John Kennedy of OK, DDS, PLLC, General Dentistry
Dr. Heath Coleman, Dr. Allen Summerlin, Dr. Mike Willbanks
in Oklahoma
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966 918-473-3700
2501 Market Trace Toll Free 1-877-473-3700
Ft. Smith, AR Hwy 266 W. Checotah, OK
8 - 5 pm Monday - Friday
We accept and fle most insurances!
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Thomas John Kennedy of Arkansas, DDS, PLLC and Associates • General Dentistry
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Thomas John Kennedy of Arkansas, DDS, PLLC and Associates • General Dentistry
One Day Dentures
WE OFFER MORE THAn juST dEnTuRES
REplACEMEnT dEnTuRES
iMMEdiATE & pARTiAl dEnTuRES • ExTRACTiOnS
dEnTAl iMplAnTS • TEETH WHiTEning
CROWn & bRidgE • pluS MuCH MORE
all at a fraction of the cost!!
Thomas John Kennedy of AR, DDS, PLLC, General Dentistry
Dr. C. Brant Crisp, Dr. Heath Coleman, Dr. Jim Curlin
in Arkansas
Thomas John Kennedy of OK, DDS, PLLC, General Dentistry
Dr. Heath Coleman, Dr. Allen Summerlin, Dr. Mike Willbanks
in Oklahoma
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966 918-473-3700
2501 Market Trace Toll Free 1-877-473-3700
Ft. Smith, AR Hwy 266 W. Checotah, OK
8 - 5 pm Monday - Friday
We accept and fle most insurances!
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
NOW OPEN IN FORT SMITH!
Per Tooth
STARTING AT
With Purchase of Dentures
EXTRACTIONS
FREE
EXAM & XRAY
Per Set
STARTING AT
With Warranty
REPLACEMENT
FULL DENTURES
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39
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395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
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$110 value
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2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
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most insurances!
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IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
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CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
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FULL DENTURES
$
39
$
395
MORE THAN JUST DENTURES
New patients only with this coupon.
$110 value
Call today to schedule your appointment!
479-434-6966
2501 Market Trace, Ft. Smith, AR 72908 (Across from Atwoods)
8-5pm Monday-Friday
1 DAY DENTURES
We accept and file
most insurances!
REPLACEMENT DENTURES
IMMEDIATE & PARTIAL DENTURES • EXTRACTIONS
DENTAL IMPLANTS • TEETH WHITENING
CROWN & BRIDGE • PLUS MUCH MORE
ALL AT A FRACTION OF THE COST!!
CHECOTAH DENTURES AND DENTAL
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39
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395
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$110 value
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in Oklahoma
Alleged church burglars snared after chase
By Kim Ross
PDN Editor
Two men who allegedly broke
into an area church are behind
bars after a police chase early Fri-
day.
Dustin Hammen, 20, and Aus-
tin Owen, 22, both who reportedly
have been living in a burned home
on Park Drive in Poteau, face mul-
tiple charges in connection with
the chase and several burglaries.
According to the LeFlore
County Sheriff’s Department at
about 3:15 a.m. Friday, deputies
spotted a car on Liberty Hill Road
in Cameron that had been reported
stolen from Poteau. Deputies said
the car, reportedly occupied by
Hammen and Owen, failed to stop
and the chase continued until the
car wrecked near Green Top Road
east of Poteau. The two men fled
on foot, according to deputies.
The LeFlore County Sheriff’s
Department later found Hammen
inside another car after he was
given a ride.
According to Poteau police
detective Vernon Qualls, Poteau
police arrested Owen after he was
seen walking Friday morning on a
Poteau street.
A search of the burned home on
Park Drive led to officers finding
stolen music equipment and the
change holder to a candy machine
taken possibly Tuesday evening
from the Greenhill Church on old
Oklahoma Highway 112 in Cam-
eron.
Also found in the house was a
purse taken from the stolen car
involved in the police chase, as
well as computer and camera
equipment taken from a third bur-
glarized vehicle, Qualls said.
Spiro gets new chief
Barham ends
36 years of
police service
By Amanda Corbin
PDN Reporter
Michael Draper, 36, of
Spiro has been appointed to
take over for Darrell Bar-
ham as chief of police for
the Spiro Police Depart-
ment.
Barham is retiring after
36 years of service.
Barham said he will
remain at the department as
a reserve with the rest of
his time being spent busy at
home.
In a letter to the editor in
the Spiro Graphic, Spiro
City Judge Doug Sanders
Jr. wrote about Barham’s
retirement, praising him for
years spent in service. Michael Draper, Spiro’s newly named police chief, poses outside the Spiro Police
Department with Darrell Barham, who recently retired after 36 years.
PDN photo by Amanda Corbin
SP shooting
victim dies
By Kim Ross
PDN Editor
A man allegedly shot by
his stepfather Sunday has
died, according to police.
Doug Byrd, 21, formerly
of Shady Point, was wound-
ed when he and his stepfa-
ther, 49-year-old Mark
Wiles allegedly fought at
Wiles’ home on Reagan
Street in Shady Point.
According to Shady
Point Chief of Police Keith
James, Byrd and his moth-
er, Diana Wiles, were at
Mark Wiles home about 11
p.m. when the shooting
happened. James said Mark
Wiles, armed with a hand-
gun, and Byrd argued. The
argument escalated until
the two men were on the
ground struggling and the
gun went off, striking Byrd
once in the torso, according
to James.
Diana Wiles then report-
edly drove Byrd to Strike-
A-Lot Bowling Alley in
Poteau where emergency
services met her and treated
Byrd.
The Poteau Police log
shows Byrd’s mother was
stopped at 11:08 p.m. at the
bowling alley, then police
contacted EMS. Byrd’s
family member Tina Craw-
ford said that Diana Wiles
wasn’t stopped by police
but rather was on the phone
with 911 who arranged the
meeting with emergency
services at the Poteau park-
ing lot.
A Tulsa Life Flight med-
ical helicopter landed at the
bowling alley and flew
Byrd to St. John’s Hospital
in Tulsa in critical condi-
Community
garden topic
of meetings
By Amanda Corbin
PDN Reporter
The Creator’s Gift Community
Garden of Poteau will host two meet-
ings Monday at Patrick Lynch Public
Library.
The first meeting starts at 1 p.m.
and the second at 5:30 p.m.
The topic of discussion is a new
community garden to be located at
418 Dewey Avenue in Poteau.
Information will be available at the
meetings for those who would like to
Wister bond issue outlined
Camargo
gets 5 years
in drug case
By Ken Milam
PDN News Editor
A previously deported
Mexican national will
spend the next five years in
a federal prison after being
convicted by a federal
grand jury this week on
drug charges stemming
from his arrest in Poteau
last September.
Tomas Camargo-Chavez,
alias Thomas Camargo and
“Scarface,” 39, was sen-
tenced Friday in the U.S.
District Court for the East-
ern District of Oklahoma in
Muskogee.
Unusable bleachers are blocked off in the gym.
PDN photo by Amanda Corbin
(See DRUGS, page 2A) (See WISTER, page 2A)
(See GARDEN, page 2A)
(See CHIEF, page 2A) (See BYRD, page 2A)
$1.25 Weekend Edition Volume 119 No. 35 16 Pages www.facebook.com/poteaudailynews
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POTEAU FOOTBALL, POCOLA TOURNEY,
RED OAK EAGLE CLASSIC, SOFTBALL, 5A
• 3A Obituaries, Calendar
• 7A Comics
• 8A Community
• 1B ‘Decorating Wisely’
• 4-5B Courts & Cops
• 6-8B Classifieds
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Also Inside:
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Sporting Goods
• Sports Briefs, 6A
• Opinions, 4A
SERVING LEFLORE COUNTY PoteauDailyNews.com SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 2014
SERVING LEFLORE COUNTY
(See BURGLARIES, page 2A)
PAGE 2A . . . SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 2014
Area
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
Each Office Independently Owned and Operated
CONGRATULATIONS!!
Joe and Gretchen Haberland on the
purchase of your beautiful Leflore County
home on Mountain View Road in Poteau,
OK
Listed and Sold By:
Debra Gentry and Michelle Green
ANOTHER SMOOTH SALE
5021 N. Broadway • Poteau, OK
918-649-0201
www.clbrealestate.com
INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 49
LEFLORE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA
(Wister Board of Education)
Taxpayer Cost Analysis
$500,000 Building Bond; Proposed Issue
(First Tax Year: 2015-2016)
Impact to the Taxpayer
2013-2014 2015-2016 Increase
Amount Amount Annual Monthly
Estimated Overall Tax Increase
2013-2014 2015-2016 Millage Percentage $25.00 $27.47 $2.47 $0.21
Taxing Entity Millage Millage Change Increase $50.00 $54.95 $4.95 $0.41
$75.00 $82.42 $7.42 $0.62
LeFlore County 21.55 21.55 0.00 $100.00 $109.89 $9.89 $0.82
Vo-Tech. District 12.35 12.35 0.00 $200.00 $219.78 $19.78 $1.65
Wister Schools 51.23 59.65 8.42 $300.00 $329.67 $29.67 $2.47
$400.00 $439.56 $39.56 $3.30
85.13 93.55 8.42 9.89% $500.00 $549.45 $49.45 $4.12
$600.00 $659.34 $59.34 $4.95
$700.00 $769.24 $69.24 $5.77
$800.00 $879.13 $79.13 $6.59
$900.00 $989.02 $89.02 $7.42
$1,000.00 $1,098.91 $98.91 $8.24
Schedule: 1 08/14/14
Stephen L. Smith, Inc.
1993-1994 school year to about 610 stu-
dents.
Money left after these improvements
would go to the school’s old gymnasium,
which has fallen into ill repair, Carpenter
said.
The top half of the bleachers has been
fenced off due to safety issues, only the
lower half usable for sitting.
The building also is in need of dressing
room repairs and a new gymnasium
floor.
According to Carpenter, the gym is
used on a daily basis during basketball
season and used for physical education
for both elementary and high school stu-
dents during rainy weather.
The old gymnasium is nearly 75 years
old and the vocational agriculture build-
ing is about 40 years old, with neither
building having seen many upgrades in
the past 25 years, he said.
Any other money would be spent on
school furnishings such as desks, tables
and other welder equipment.
The proposition needs a 60 percent
vote to pass in the election set for Tues-
day, Aug. 26.
The sentence totaled 63 months in
prison followed by three years’ supervised
relase.
Camargo was arrested Sept. 26 after
state and federal agents allegedly found a
half-pound of methamphetamine in his car
during a traffic stop at Choctaw Travel
Plaza. Camargo had been under surveil-
lance for about a month by Oklahoma
Bureau of Narcotics and Department of
Homeland Security Investigations.
Authorities said at the time they sus-
pected Camargo of distributing drugs from
the Poteau Inn, where he had been stay-
ing.
During a search of Camargo’s car,
investigators said they found a Coor’s
Light beer can with a screw-on lid that
contained the half-pound of meth.
After arresting Camargo and booking
him into the LeFlore County Detention
Center, investigators obtained a search
warrant for his room at Poteau Inn. During
a search of the room, they said they found
seven grams of methamphetamine, digital
scales and drug paraphernalia.
Camargo had been deported and
removed from the United States from Eng-
land Air Force Base at Rapides, La., in
May 2008, according to the indictment.
He was sentenced by U.S. District
Judge James H. Payne. Assistant U.S.
Attorney Kyle Waters prosecuted the
case.
“I’ve been blessed and honored to work
with Chief Barham for 21 years of his 36
years of service to Spiro.” Sanders wrote.
“He taught me a lot and I’ve learned
almost everything I know about being a
city judge from Chief Barham, all without
him ever even realizing it or knowing it, as
a result of his cool, calm, analytical
approach to his job.”
Draper has been with the department
for three years. Before working in Spiro,
he worked as a full-time deputy for four
years at the LeFlore County Sheriff’s
Office.
Draper will work alongside five other
officers and Barham.
Spiro officers are Jaclyn Emmert, who
finished CLEET training in 2014; Larry
Ashing as a reserve; Danny Erwin, who
has been with the department for six
months, and Toby Teach and Theo Capes,
who have both worked at the department
for several years.
“I enjoyed working for 36 years. And I
think that we made a difference.” Barham
said.
“I’m leaving it in capable hands and
things will continue as it was.”
tion, according to first responders. Police
said Byrd underwent surgery after reach-
ing the hospital.
According to James, the LeFlore Coun-
ty District Attorney’s Office and the Okla-
homa State Bureau of Investigation were
called to assist in the investigation.
James said investigators took a hand-
gun and a shell casing found at the scene
into evidence. Police also impounded
Byrd’s mother’s car as evidence and
retrieved Byrd’s clothing from the hospi-
tal, according to James.
Wiles was detained and questioned by
investigators and later released.
No charges had been filed against him
in connection with the shooting as of press
time.
Both men are being held
without bail in the LeFlore
County Detention Center
on suspicion of second-
degree burglary, knowingly
concealing stolen property
and malicious injury to
property. Qualls said the
two may face more charges
in connection with the bur-
glaries and the police
chase.
Greenhill Church Pastor
Bill Sanders said the only
thing stolen from the church
and not found by police was
money parishioners had
been raising to donate to St.
Jude’s.
“Its bad enough to steal,
but it’s another thing to steal
from God’s children,” said
Sanders.
“I want to thank the offi-
cers and deputies who found
the items stolen from our
church.”
aid in the building of the
garden, want to have a gar-
dening plot or to receive
information about the giv-
ing of monetary donations
and supplies.
Creator’s Gift Commu-
nity Garden is a non-profit
organization.
According to their web-
site, gardening classes will
be provided for residents and
be taught by experienced
volunteer gardeners, a retired
research gardener and Okla-
homa State University
Extension employees.
Classes will cover the
basics of container garden-
ing, companion planting,
square foot gardening and
more.
The garden, once built,
will be ran on a volunteer
base only.
Local Boy Scouts and
Girl Scouts can earn badges
and community service
hours by growing and
donating produce to local
foods banks, according to
Creator’s Gift.
The garden’s goal, web-
site states, is to aid and
assist in the diet, health and
well-being of Poteau citi-
zens as well as help encour-
age community involve-
ment to “foster friendships
and a sense of being part of
something greater.”
For more information, or
if you would like to volun-
teer or donate, contact Terry
Hall at (918) 655-7878.
CHIEF
SENTENCED
GARDEN
Table shows projected impact on local property taxes if school bond passes.
BYRD
BURGLARIES
WISTER
Portions of the procceds could be used for new furniture.
Rusted siding and a leaky roof in the vo-ag building would be repaired.
PDN photos by Amanda Corbin
Compiled by Ken Milam
newseditor.pdn@gmail.com
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
Area
SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 2014 . . . PAGE 3A
Open Monday – Friday 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Saturday 9:30 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Across from KFC, Poteau • 647-2701
jacksjewelers@windstream.net
Check for new arrivals on our facebook.
CASH FOR GOLD © 2014 JATW
You know which
of her buttons
to push
This is for thrills and chills.
2
0
1
4
1509 S. McKenna, Poteau • www.ktc.edu
647-4525 • 1-888-567-6632
Become a fan on FACEBOOK/kiamichitechcenters-poteau
WE ACCEPT MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, VISA AND AMERICAN EXPRESS
BREAK THROUGH
to Your Potential
INCREASE YOUR EARNING POWER!
KTC, Poteau Campus is offering a series of short- term
night classes during the 2014-15 school year!
EARN NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED Certifications
in any of the following classes!!!
• Auto Service Technology
• Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning
• Welding Technology
• Electrical Technology
ENROLL for the Classes at the following times:
MON. August 18, 2014 at 5:15 p.m.
TUES., August 19, 2014 at 5:15 p.m.
THURS. August 21, 2014 at 5:15 p.m .
Tuition: $ 1.25 per hr.—No Finanacial Aid Available
Today is
National Airborne Day
• TODAY — Conc e r t
Under the Stars, Jay
Falkner Band, 8 p.m.,
Donald W. Reynolds
Community Center.
— Bake sale to benefit
Poteau Pound Pups, 9
a.m. to 1 p.m., The
Coffee Cup.
— LeFlore County Round-
Up Club play day, Cecil
Leachman Arena,
Heavener. Info: Frank
Mode, (918) 839-0330.
• AUG. 17 — Wright
Ministries music and
testimony, 6 p.m., New
Beginning Family
Minstry, 305 S. Saddler.
Info: (918) 721-3490 or
(918) 649-4708.
• AUG. 18 — Public meet-
ings to discuss proposed
Creat or ’s Gi ft
Community Garden of
Poteau, 1 and 5:30 p.m.,
Patrick Lynch Public
Library. Info: Terry Hall,
(918) 655-7878.
— Teachers meeting con-
cerning proposed sales
tax for Eastern Oklahoma
Medical Center, 9 a.m.,
Whitesboro Public
Schools.
— Free weekly Choctaw
language classes begin,
6-8 p.m., Talihina
Community Center. Info:
Teri Billy, (800) 522-
6170.
• AUG. 19 — Public meet-
ing concerning proposed
sales tax for Eastern
Oklahoma Medical
Center, time TBA,
Panama Community
Center.
— Nancy Frier, chief
financial officer of
Eastern Oklahoma
Medical Store, will
speak LeFlore County
Tea Party meeting, 6:30
p.m., Patrick Lynch
Library. The public is
invited.
— Auditions for “The
Little Prince,” 6 p.m.,
Poteau High School
choir room. Info: (918)
647-3079.
— Auditions for children’s
Treble Choir, 6:30 p.m.,
Poteau First United
Methodist Church, 109
S. Harper.
• AUG. 20 — Public meet-
ing concerning proposed
sales tax for Eastern
Oklahoma Medical
Center, 7 p.m., Wister
School cafetorium.
— Auditions for LeFlore
County talent show (ages
5-15), 5-9 p.m., Bob Lee
Kidd Civic Center.
Poteau High School.
• AUG. 21 — Auditions
for LeFlore County tal-
ent show (ages 16 and
older), 5-9 p.m., Bob Lee
Kidd Civic Center.
Poteau High School.
• AUG. 23 — LeFlore
County talent show, 2
p.m., Bob Lee Kidd
Civic Center. Poteau
High School.
— Third annual Dr. John
M o n t g o m e r y
Scholarship Banquet, 6
p.m, Donald W. Reynolds
Community Center in
Poteau. Info: Wesley
Hooks, (479) 420-3721.
— Brave the Mud run to
benefit Women’s Crisis
Services, 9 a.m., LeFlore
County Fairgrounds.
Info: Glenda Wise. (918)
839-4785 or glenda-
wise@windstream.net.
© 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Puzzle #3256-D
Difficult
1 2 3
4 1 5 6 7
8 7
9 5 3 2
6 2 5 1
7 4
5 2 1 7 6
1 9 8
Each puzzle is divided into
nine sections, and each section
has nine blank squares. Fill in all
81 squares on the puzzle with
numbers 1 to 9. You may not
repeat any numbers in any one of
the nine sections that you've
already used elsewhere in that
section. Also, you can use each
number 1-9 only once in each
horizontal line of nine squares,
and in each vertical column of
nine squares. The puzzle is com-
pleted when you correctly fill
every square. © 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Solution #3255-M
6 7 8 4 1 3 9 2 5
3 9 5 2 8 7 1 6 4
2 4 1 5 6 9 8 3 7
7 5 3 9 2 8 4 1 6
9 8 6 1 4 5 2 7 3
4 1 2 7 3 6 5 8 9
5 3 4 8 7 2 6 9 1
1 2 7 6 9 4 3 5 8
8 6 9 3 5 1 7 4 2
Solution to Aug. 15 puzzle
Today's Weather
Local 5-Day Forecast
Sat
8/16
95/75
Mostly
cloudy skies
early will be-
come partly
cloudy later
in the day.
Sunrise:
6:39 AM
Sunset:
8:05 PM
Sun
8/17
95/73
Thunder-
storms de-
veloping in
the after-
noon.
Sunrise:
6:40 AM
Sunset:
8:04 PM
Mon
8/18
98/74
Showers
and thun-
derstorms
late.
Sunrise:
6:41 AM
Sunset:
8:03 PM
Tue
8/19
96/72
A few
clouds.
Highs in the
mid 90s and
lows in the
low 70s.
Sunrise:
6:41 AM
Sunset:
8:02 PM
Wed
8/20
96/72
Partly
cloudy with
a stray thun-
derstorm.
Sunrise:
6:42 AM
Sunset:
8:00 PM
Oklahoma City
100/78
Tulsa
99/75
Lawton
100/74
Enid
102/72
Poteau
95/75
Oklahoma At A Glance
Area Cities
City Hi Lo Cond. City Hi Lo Cond.
Antlers 99 76 pt sunny Oklahoma City 100 78 pt sunny
Ardmore 99 78 pt sunny Okmulgee 96 72 t-storm
Bartlesville 96 71 mst sunny Pauls Valley 99 75 pt sunny
Broken Bow 96 73 mst sunny Perry 101 73 pt sunny
Claremore 97 73 t-storm Sallisaw 94 72 pt sunny
Cordell 101 74 pt sunny Sapulpa 99 75 t-storm
Duncan 101 76 cloudy Shawnee 101 76 pt sunny
El Reno 100 74 pt sunny Snyder 102 75 pt sunny
Elk City 100 74 pt sunny Stillwater 101 72 pt sunny
Enid 102 72 pt sunny Tahlequah 93 69 t-storm
Guymon 97 67 pt sunny Tulsa 99 75 t-storm
Lawton 100 74 pt sunny Watonga 101 73 pt sunny
McAlester 96 75 pt sunny Weatherford 101 74 pt sunny
Miami 94 72 t-storm Wewoka 99 75 pt sunny
Muskogee 95 73 t-storm Woodward 101 71 pt sunny
National Cities
City Hi Lo Cond. City Hi Lo Cond.
Atlanta 91 69 pt sunny Minneapolis 87 64 t-storm
Boston 79 64 mst sunny New York 82 67 mst sunny
Chicago 82 65 t-storm Phoenix 103 77 sunny
Dallas 103 80 pt sunny San Francisco 67 56 pt sunny
Denver 88 60 sunny Seattle 78 59 pt sunny
Houston 97 79 t-storm St. Louis 88 72 t-storm
Los Angeles 86 66 pt sunny Washington, DC 86 67 sunny
Miami 89 80 t-storm
Moon Phases
Full
Aug 10
Last
Aug 17
New
Aug 25
First
Sep 2
UV Index
Sat
8/16
9
Very High
Sun
8/17
10
Very High
Mon
8/18
10
Very High
Tue
8/19
10
Very High
Wed
8/20
10
Very High
The UV Index is measured on a 0 - 11 number scale,
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.
0 11
©2010 American Profile Hometown Content Service
Today's Weather
Local 5-Day Forecast
Sat
8/16
95/75
Mostly
cloudy skies
early will be-
come partly
cloudy later
in the day.
Sunrise:
6:39 AM
Sunset:
8:05 PM
Sun
8/17
95/73
Thunder-
storms de-
veloping in
the after-
noon.
Sunrise:
6:40 AM
Sunset:
8:04 PM
Mon
8/18
98/74
Showers
and thun-
derstorms
late.
Sunrise:
6:41 AM
Sunset:
8:03 PM
Tue
8/19
96/72
A few
clouds.
Highs in the
mid 90s and
lows in the
low 70s.
Sunrise:
6:41 AM
Sunset:
8:02 PM
Wed
8/20
96/72
Partly
cloudy with
a stray thun-
derstorm.
Sunrise:
6:42 AM
Sunset:
8:00 PM
Oklahoma City
100/78
Tulsa
99/75
Lawton
100/74
Enid
102/72
Poteau
95/75
Oklahoma At A Glance
Area Cities
City Hi Lo Cond. City Hi Lo Cond.
Antlers 99 76 pt sunny Oklahoma City 100 78 pt sunny
Ardmore 99 78 pt sunny Okmulgee 96 72 t-storm
Bartlesville 96 71 mst sunny Pauls Valley 99 75 pt sunny
Broken Bow 96 73 mst sunny Perry 101 73 pt sunny
Claremore 97 73 t-storm Sallisaw 94 72 pt sunny
Cordell 101 74 pt sunny Sapulpa 99 75 t-storm
Duncan 101 76 cloudy Shawnee 101 76 pt sunny
El Reno 100 74 pt sunny Snyder 102 75 pt sunny
Elk City 100 74 pt sunny Stillwater 101 72 pt sunny
Enid 102 72 pt sunny Tahlequah 93 69 t-storm
Guymon 97 67 pt sunny Tulsa 99 75 t-storm
Lawton 100 74 pt sunny Watonga 101 73 pt sunny
McAlester 96 75 pt sunny Weatherford 101 74 pt sunny
Miami 94 72 t-storm Wewoka 99 75 pt sunny
Muskogee 95 73 t-storm Woodward 101 71 pt sunny
National Cities
City Hi Lo Cond. City Hi Lo Cond.
Atlanta 91 69 pt sunny Minneapolis 87 64 t-storm
Boston 79 64 mst sunny New York 82 67 mst sunny
Chicago 82 65 t-storm Phoenix 103 77 sunny
Dallas 103 80 pt sunny San Francisco 67 56 pt sunny
Denver 88 60 sunny Seattle 78 59 pt sunny
Houston 97 79 t-storm St. Louis 88 72 t-storm
Los Angeles 86 66 pt sunny Washington, DC 86 67 sunny
Miami 89 80 t-storm
Moon Phases
Full
Aug 10
Last
Aug 17
New
Aug 25
First
Sep 2
UV Index
Sat
8/16
9
Very High
Sun
8/17
10
Very High
Mon
8/18
10
Very High
Tue
8/19
10
Very High
Wed
8/20
10
Very High
The UV Index is measured on a 0 - 11 number scale,
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.
0 11
©2010 American Profile Hometown Content Service
Harold Wayne Taylor
Harold Wayne Taylor, 73, died Tuesday,
Aug. 12, 2014 in Tulsa with his family by
his side.
Harold was born Jan. 31, 1941, in Fort.
Smith, Ark., to Berkley N. and Flora Mae
Barnes Taylor. He grew up in Spiro.
Harold joined the U.S. Army, serving
from 1958 until being honorably
discharged in 1962.
Harold married Patsy J. Kinsey on
June 23, 1962, in Panama. For most of his
life, Harold worked as a machinist in the
aerospace industry, retiring in 1995 from A.M.I. In his
spare time, Harold enjoyed building trailers and gardening.
He will be remembered best for his love for his family.
Harold was preceded in death by his parents and
siblings, Gene, Jack, Paul and Juanita.
Harold is survived by his beloved wife of 52 years,
Patsy of the home; son, Harold W. Taylor Jr. and his wife
Melinda of Russellville, Ark.; brother, Wilburn Taylor, of
Panama; sister, Pauline Brown, of Broken Arrow;
grandchildren, Caleb Taylor and Mason Taylor; and
great-grandchildren, Avrey and Axton Taylor
Services will be held at 2 p.m. Monday, Aug. 18, at
Panama Free Will Baptist Church with the Rev. Pete
Butler officiating. Burial will be in Shady Point Cemetery
under the direction of Bixby Funeral Service, Bixby.
This year the Choctaw Nation dedi-
cated the annual Labor Day Festival to
the strong Choctaw women who are the
heart of Choctaw culture.
Throughout history and from the
beginning, Choctaw mothers and grand-
mothers gave life, love and learning to
the tribe’s children and formed the core
for the tribal matrilineal society.
Women have harvested the crops,
tended to the homes, were incredible art-
ists and were valued members of a tribe
and thus were referred to as “beloved.”
“Honoring the Giver of Life” is meant
to signify the special bond and guidance
given to the Choctaw people by the mod-
ern Choctaw woman and to show appre-
ciation for continual leadership in faith,
family, and culture.
Events for this year’s festival will
begin at 7 p.m. Aug. 28 with the Princess
Pageant and continue through Sept. 1
ending with Chief Gary Batton’s State of
the Nation Address along with door prize
drawings and lunch.
The Labor Day Festival is held at the
Choctaw Nation Capitol building at Tush-
ka Homma and is expected to draw more
than 100,000 visitors. Admission to the
festival is free as well as parking, rides,
and concerts.
Pow Wow Grand Entry will begin 7
p.m. on the Capitol lawn with a special
statue unveiling ceremony of treasured
former Choctaw council member Char-
lotte Jackson. Jackson’s statue will be the
first female statue to be erected at the
Capitol and women attending will receive
commemorative buttons as a special
honor.
Main attractions for this year’s festi-
val will include entertainers Merle Hag-
gard, Jeff Foxworthy, Duck Dynasty’s
Willie and Korie Robertson, Chris Cagle,
Jason Crabb and several local perform-
ers.
Traditional Choctaw cultural events
such as gospel singing, dancing, stickball
and crafts will be held throughout the
festival.
A fast pitch tournament, 5k race, horse-
shoe tournaments, an arts and crafts show
and special exhibits also will be held.
Fest theme honors women
Castillo finishes
U.S. Army
basic training
Army Pvt. Arnoldo Cas-
tillo has graduated from ba-
sic combat training at Fort
Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied
the Army mission, history,
tradition and core values,
physical fitness, and re-
ceived instruction and prac-
tice in basic combat skills,
military weapons, chemical
warfare and bayonet train-
ing, drill and ceremony,
marching, rifle marksman-
ship, armed and unarmed
combat, map reading, field
tactics, military courtesy,
military justice system, ba-
sic first aid, foot marches
and field training exercises.
Castillo is the son of
Jose and Olga Castillo of
Heavener.
One September afternoon, I sat across from three village
elders in their 60s. They lived just a few miles from Pakistan.
I was there to talk to them about working with the Afghan
government.
One of the elders described the corruption of a new
bureaucrat he knew. He explained that this guy was the kind
who used his official power to enrich himself. As upset as he
was about this, he seemed to be more upset that the guy
came from a poor family, and now was getting rich. As if it
was worse for a poor man to be corrupt than it was a rich
one.
After a little more Pashto conversation, one of them said
something that caused the other two to break out laughing. I
looked at my interpreter for an explanation.
“Plastic shoe, leather style,” he translated. It is an Afghan
proverb that insults arrogance. People who wear plastic
shoes walk as if they were made of leather.
I come from a small, one-stoplight town in Oklahoma. I
get the all hat, no cattle slur. I chuckle when it nails some-
one’s persona spot-on. But I still have trouble with the plas-
tic shoe, leather style bit.
Across the cultural divide, in a place that is radically
primitive by American standards, people still find humor in
others trying to be someone they are not.
Jarrid Jackson is presently on his second tour in
Afghanistan as a captain in the U.S. Army. He is a native
Oklahoman, an Oologah and West Point graduate and
Ranger-qualified. Email him at darkcloudzenas@yahoo.
com.
What in the heck is going
on with the police in
Ferguson, Mo., and journal-
ists? The St. Louis suburb
has been the scene of peace-
ful protests and charged
emotions, and nightly chaos
and rampant looting, follow-
ing the Aug. 9 shooting death
of a black teenager, Michael
Brown, by a yet-to-be-iden-
tified police officer. In the
confusion and violence of
the first nights of violence,
journalists first reported
being ordered away from
where rioting occurred or
barred from entering the city.
A St. Louis Post-Dispatch
photojournalist who had
been assaulted Sunday night
by a looter sought refuge in a
police line — only to be
asked later by an officer
“why are you here?”, taken
into custody and transported
to a police station. On
Wednesday night, incidents
involving journalists
involved tear gas and
arrests:
• A KSDK TV crew
reported that seconds after
filming police tussling with
a man, their video camera
was hit by a “bean-bag
round,” the type of non-
lethal weapon police were
reported to be using to break
up demonstrations. The crew
later was approached by
police with drawn weapons
and ordered to leave the
area.
• A tear gas canister was
fired at an Al Jazeera America
TV crew, which had set up a
camera on a sidewalk out-
side an established police
perimeter. As the journalists
fled the gas, armed officers
were videotaped tilting the
crew’s camera toward the
ground.
• Wesley Lowery, a
reporter for The Washington
Post, and Ryan Reilly of The
Huffington Post, were
detained and led away by
armor-clad police carrying
assault weapons who ordered
journalists to leave a
McDonald’s where news
media were working and
recharging equipment. Both
were later released without
explanation, with one report
saying their release came
after the city police chief
was asked by The Los
Angeles Times about the
arrests.
At a midday press confer-
ence Thursday, Ferguson
Chief of Police Jon Belmar
said, in response to questions
about the various incidents,
“The media is not a target.”
But David Boardman,
president of the American
Society of News Editors,
said just hours earlier in a
posted statement that “from
the beginning of this situa-
tion, the police have made
conscious decisions to
restrict information and
images coming from
Ferguson. Of course, these
efforts largely have been
unsuccessful, as the nation
and the world are still seeing
for themselves the heinous
actions of the police. For
every reporter they arrest,
every image they block,
every citizen they censor,
another will still write, pho-
tograph and speak.”
Reilly said the scene dur-
ing his arrest Wednesday
was “madness.” In a account
posted by Politico, he said he
“was not moving quickly
enough for their liking ... I
was told I had 45 seconds,
30 seconds, pack up all my
stuff and leave, at which
point the officer in question
... held me back, grabbed my
things and shoved them into
my bag.” After being hand-
cuffed, Reilly said, “The
worst part was he slammed
my head against the glass
purposely on the way out of
the McDonald’s then sarcas-
tically apologized for it.”
Martin D. Baron, execu-
tive editor of The Washington
Post, said “there was abso-
lutely no justification for
Lowery’s arrest” and that the
organization “was appalled
by the conduct of the officers
involved.” Baron said that
Lowery “was illegally
instructed to stop taking
video of officers (and) ...
after contradictory instruc-
tions on how to exit, he was
slammed against a soda
machine and then hand-
cuffed.” Baron said police
behavior was “wholly
unwarranted and an assault
on the freedom of the press
to cover the news.”
On Twitter, Lowery
wrote, “Apparently, in
America, in 2014, police can
manhandle you, take you
into custody, put you in cell
and then open the door like it
didn’t happen.”
No, the government may
not do that — to journalists
or any other citizen, all of
whom enjoy the rights guar-
anteed by the First
Amendment. The nation’s
founders provided constitu-
tional protection for a free
press precisely to keep
authorities from figuratively
or literally manhandling or
muzzling what they intended
to be a “watchdog on gov-
ernment.”
To effectively fulfill that
watchdog role, journalists
must be able to see and report
to their fellow citizens what
government is doing —
whether that is a Grand Jury
investigation into Brown’s
death or how police are
responding to what clearly
is, at times, lawless behavior
in the streets of Ferguson.
Local citizens and the
nation need to know, from a
variety of sources, what is
happening in this strife-torn
city, and to be sure no stone
is left unturned in investigat-
ing how Brown came to be
shot. And press conferences
and official statements alone
are not enough to overcome
the distrust over yet another
shooting of a black teen by a
police officer.
Freedom to report the
news necessarily means the
freedom to gather it, whether
a journalist for mainstream
media or a citizen using a
cell phone camera.
Police and others in
Ferguson anxious about
those reporting on their
activities should know that
“no news” is not “good
news” — for them or anyone
else in their city or in
America.
Gene Policinski, chief
operating officer of the
Newseum Institute, also is
senior vice president of the
First Amendment Center, a
center of the institute. He is a
veteran journalist whose
career has included work in
newspapers, radio, televi-
sion and online. He can be
reached at gpolicinski@
newseum.org.
EDITORIAL CONTENT POLICY: Columns,
cartoons and letters to the editor published in this
newspaper do not necessarily reflect the opinions of
the Poteau Daily News or its management.
PAGE 4A . . . SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 2014 Opinions POTEAU DAILY NEWS
Media and Missouri:
What the heck is going on?
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SERVING LEFLORE COUNTY
2013
BETTER
NEWSPAPER CONTEST
AWARD WINNER
Presented by the
OKLAHOMA PRESS
ASSOCIATION
Guest Column
Gene Policinski
Our little children are learning machines. If we could only
continue to soak in information, learn new skills and lan-
guage and make connections as adults at the rate we did as
babies and small children, we might have many of the
world’s conundrums solved by now. As a children’s librari-
an, I get a front row seat to watch these miracles taking
place.
As I sat at my keyboard preparing to share something
with you, two things were on my mind: The Early Literacy
Summer Reading Program’s summary reports and, though I
had to push the subject back for now, preparing for a visit
from my 16-month-old granddaughter. Our church will be
having a “baby day” to celebrate our little ones under 3 and
I’m so glad she will be a part of that day. These events are
connected by the realization of how much is learned at this
age, and how quickly. Those of us who have some interac-
tion with children this age, whether our own children, neigh-
bors, extended family, professionally or otherwise, should
remind ourselves of what is going on in those little heads and
bodies, and what we can do to maximize these never-again
developmental opportunities.
When you’re reading a book to a young child, you may
feel there’s not much return for your time, especially if they
seem to be just half listening or seem to lose interest before
you are through. Oh, if we could see in their brains: print
awareness, listening vocabulary, narrative development,
phonological awareness (how words sound) and much more
is being patterned into their gray matter. When you read
rhymes, read with rhythm or with inflections and varying
volume, the fun of hearing is increased another dimension.
To help prepare them for speech, pause between syllables or
sounds: b-oy; b-ook; b-abbling b-rook. Encourage them to
say it with you. Hold attention longer by taking their hand to
touch the picture you’re reading about, ask them to point to
objects or have them turn the page when you say “bing.”
Don’t worry if you don’t finish the book or story this time.
They’re getting lots of messages, and if you enjoy the pro-
cess along with the child, they’ll want more next time. Do
these activities feel uncomfortable for you — make you feel
“foolish”? Get over it by reminding yourself the opposite is
happening to your little listener. We also tend to get tired of
reading the same favorite things to a child, but repetition
builds good, deep brain “tracks” helping children to retain
and add to their knowledge base.
What can you do at home to create reading readiness and
how early should you start? Babies learn from finger plays,
songs, rhymes, stories, looking at books, handling board
books or soft books, stimulating senses with sounds, tex-
tures, stretch exercises. Let toddlers shadow you by repeat-
ing your motions in sweeping the floor, folding clothes,
washing car, etc. Name the objects you are passing as you
touch them: Daddy’s chair; comb; tree ... and so on. For age-
isolated children, look for interaction opportunities with
other children in church, play dates with friends, letting an
elementary student “babysit” while remaining unobtrusively
nearby. Oh, and remember Patrick Lynch Public Library’s
Discovery Depot, also known as the children’s library. There
are plenty of free learning, meeting and play spaces there.
Again in September, we will be starting weekly pro-
grams we call “T.L.C.” — Training Literate Children with
Tender Loving Care — for toddlers through pre-kindergar-
ten age children. Opportunities to develop many of these
skills mentioned above are purposefully included in these
programs to help prepare participants for the more institu-
tional learning soon to come, though I hope both the chil-
dren and the “big people” that bring them have so much fun
they don’t notice the learning aspects
Though the children’s and teen summer programs have
ended, the Adult SRP has not. The Adult Summer Reading
Program drawing for the Kindle Fire will take place at 4
p.m. on Aug. 29. There is still time to check out more books
and put your name in the jug each time you check out a
book.
There will be no adult Arthritis Exercise program on
Tuesday, Aug. 19, but check the library calendar for future
dates.
The Stitchers group will meet from 12–2 p.m. in the
Community Room on Aug. 21, planning to celebrate sun-
flowers and adding a program on “Women from the Past” to
the brown bag lunch.
Meet your friends at Patrick Lynch Public Library.
Carole Gill is the children’s and young adult librarian at
Patrick Lynch Public Library in Poteau. E-mail her at car-
olegill@oklibrary.net.
Treasure Hunting
Carole Gill
Reading is learning
From the Front
Jarrid Jackson
I still don’t get the plastic shoes
WHITESBORO — The
Whitesboro Lady Bulldogs
bounced back from Tues-
day’s season-opening shut-
out at the hands of Panama
to down the Talihina Lady
Golden Tigers 4-2 Thursday
afternoon.
The Lady Bulldogs (1-1)
scored twice in the frst and
single runs in the next two
innings for a 4-0 lead.
The Lady Golden Tigers
(0-1) got their two runs in
the seventh inning on Bailee
Anderson’s two-RBI single.
Lexey Branscum (1-1)
got the win, pitching a two-
hitter with eight strikeouts.
For the game, Molly
Young was 1-for-3 with a
double, a run batted in and
a run scored, Peyton Hoyer
was 1-for-3, Abigail Phillips
was 1-for-2 with an RBI,
Branscum, Miriah Freder-
ick and Lauren Harper each
scored a run and Shania
McKosky had an RBI.
In defeat, Anderson was
1-for-3 with her two-RBI
double, while Kayla Himes
was 1-for-3. Malacha Austin
(0-1) took the loss, despite
fanning seven batters and
tossing a three-hitter.
Panama 7, Whitesboro
0: Tuesday in Panama, Pan-
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
Sports
SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 2014 . . . PAGE 5A
The Poteau Daily News is your best source
for local sports coverage in LeFlore County
Wister girls beat Spiro to reach
Pocola Tournament finals
Championship game was scheduled for Friday night
POCOLA — The Wister Lady Wildcats
might have brought home a tournament
championship Friday night. They were in
line to do so.
The Lady Wildcats beat the Spiro Lady
Bulldogs 4-3 in Thursday night’s winner’s-
bracket fnals.
Spiro played Heavener in Friday’s loser’s-
bracket fnal with the winner meeting Wister.
The if-game was slated for 8 p.m. Friday if
needed.
The Lady Wolves won both of their con-
solation games, beating Stigler 9-2 and host
Pocola 4-1. The Lady Indians, who took the
place of the Keota Lady Lions who dropped
out, beat Cameron 11-0.
In the winner’s-bracket fnal, an RBI sin-
gle by Wister’s Kyla Brown scored Tristen
Hagelberger with the go-ahead run in the
fourth inning to break a 3-all tie.
For the game, Brown was 2-for-3 with a
run scored and the game-winning RBI for
the Lady ’Cats (4-0). Hagelberger and Justyn
Lynn were each 1-for-3 for Wister.
Hunter Gibson (4-0) got the win, striking
out three batters and throwing a three-hitter.
In defeat, Morgan Shaw was 1-for-3 with
a run scored, Bailey Cox was 1-for-2 with a
run scored and Hannah Gilliam was 1-for-
2 for the Lady Bulldogs (2-1). Gilliam (2-1)
took the loss, despite fanning three batter in
fve innings.
In Heavener’s victory over Pocola, the
Lady Wolves (4-1) scored single runs in
each of the frst two innings before the Lady
Indians (2-2) cut the defcit in half in the
third inning.
The Lady Wolves got two insurance runs
in the ffth on Elyssa Turner’s two-RBI dou-
ble to get the three-run victory.
McKenzie Wilson (3-1) got the win,
pitching a three-hitter with two strikeouts.
For the game, Jodie Hill was 1-for-3 and a
run batted in, Jacee Manley was 1-for-3 with
a run scored, Turner was 1-for-3 with a two-
run double for Heavener.
In defeat, Desi Carter was 1-for-3, Brook-
lyn Morton was 1-for-2 with a run scored
and Morgan Francis was 1-for-3 with a dou-
ble for Pocola.
Sarah Eddins (2-2) took the loss, despite
fanning four batter and tossing a three-hit-
ter.
In Heavener’s win over Stigler, the Lady
Wolves broke a scoreless tie with a six-run
second inning.
For the game, Lily Friedl was 1-for-1 with
two walks and two runs scored for Heavener,
which was issued 11 walks by Stigler pitch-
ing.
Wilson got the win, striking out three bat-
ters in her three-hitter.
In Pocola’s victory over Cameron, the
Lady Indians scored once in the opening
inning, fve runs in the second, a run in the
third and fve more runs in the fourth.
For the game, Sammie Kuhns was 3-for-3
with a double, a triple, three runs scored and
two RBIs, Carter was 2-for-3 with two runs
scored, Madison Hudkins was 2-for-3 with
a double and two RBIs, Macae Pipkins was
2-for-3, Morton was 1-for-3 with two RBIs
and Courtney Hargrove was 1-for-3 with an
RBI triple for Pocola.
Eddins got the win, fanning three bat-
ters and allowing only a frst-inning single
to Amber Bailey in three innings. Kuhns
pitched the fnal inning with two strikeouts.
Dakotha Battice (1-2) took the loss for the
Lady Yellowjackets (1-2).
LAUNCHING PADS — Poteau linemen go through a blocking drill during Friday
afternoon’s practice, which was the first one in which the players could don pads.
The Pirates’ Red-White Interteam Scrimmage is 6:30 tonight at Costner Stadium.
Admission is bottles of Gatorade and/or Powerade
PDN photo by David Seeley
Poteau Red-White Scrimmage
tonight at Costner Stadium
Admission is bottles of Gatorade, Powerade
By David Seeley
PDN Sports Editor
Football is back in Po-
teau, at least the preseason
that is.
The 2014 Red-White
Interteam Scrimmage will
be at 6:30 tonight at Cost-
ner Stadium. Admission is
bottles of Gatorade and/or
Powerade.
Tonight will be the frst
game-like situation since
the 2013 Class 4A state title
game last December and the
spring game in May.
“Anytime you turn the
lights on and have a chance
to get out there, it’s always
a kind of a neat feeling,”
Poteau coach Greg Werner
said. “Hopefully, the folks
will come out and watch, see
what’s going on and get their
frst taste of football.”
Werner said that there are
a couple of things he and
his staff will be looking for
during tonight’s interteam
scrimmage.
“One, we’re going to
start seeing who can play,
and who has a chance to get
into the line-up,” he said.
“We’re not only looking for
starters but back-ups. We’re
also trying to fnd our mis-
takes, and fnd the ways to
correct them. [Tonight] will
be a great chance for every-
body to get an opportunity to
play.”
(See POTEAU, Page 6A)
(See SOFTBALL, Page 6A)
Thursday/Late Tuesday High School Softball Roundup
Whitesboro girls get first win
of season, double up Talihina
Wister boys make Red Oak Eagle
Classic championship semifinals
Whitesboro Bulldogs, Howe Lions eliminated
RED OAK — The Wister Wildcats won
their opening-round game Thursday in the
2014 Red Oak Eagle Classic.
The ’Cats got their frst victory of the sea-
son in what was their season opener, defeat-
ing the Buffalo Valley Buffaloes 7-3.
Wister played Crowder, which beat the
Howe Lions 10-1 on Thursday, in one cham-
pionship semifnal. The winner will play for
the title at 3 this afternoon, while the loser
will play for third place at noon.
The Whitebsoro Bulldogs, who had only
eight players each day for the tournament,
faced the Red Oak junior varsity because
Cameron dropped out of the tournament,
and the ’Dogs lost 13-7. Whitesboro faced
Stuart in the consolation semifnals Friday
afternoon and were eliminated 9-1.
The Lions were the frst team to be elimi-
nated, losing 6-3 to the Red Oak JV on Fri-
day afternoon. No more information was
reported.
(See CLASSIC, Page 6A)
In Wister’s victory, the
Wildcats (1-0) broke a
scoreless tie with a two-run
third inning, followed by a
single run in the fourth and
two runs in each of the ffth
and sixth innings.
Jake Sconyers (1-0) got
the win, pitching a fve-hitter
with 10 strikeouts.
For the game, Jesse Ham-
mons was 2-for-3 with a run
scored, while Kolton Lynn
was 2-for-4 with a double
and a run scored for Wister.
In Howe’s loss to
Crowder, the Demons broke
a scoreless tie with a single
run in the third inning, fol-
lowed by a four-run fourth
and a fve-run ffth.
The Lions (1-3) avoided
the shutout on Hunter John-
son’s RBI scoring Diego
Sanchez in the ffth inning.
In defeat, Chase Blake
was 3-for-3, Sanchez was
2-for-2 with a run scored and
Tyler Singleterry was 1-for-
2 for Howe.
In Whitesboro’s loss to
Stuart, Joe Smith (0-1) took
the loss for the Bulldogs (0-
3).
In Whitesboro’s loss to
the Red Oak JV, Smith had
two doubles, while Austin
Stepp had a double. Sawyer
Adams (0-1) took the loss.
Just like last May’s spring
game, the Pirates will be
split into equal teams.
“We’ll try to evenly
match the squads as best we
can to make it a fun scrim-
mage,” Werner said. “We
don’t want it to be lopsided.
We want to have fun. It will
be a good scrimmage, and
it will be a good chance for
everybody to come watch us
for the frst time to see what
we look like.”
Werner said the frst week
of practice has been very
good.
“It’s been great,” said
Werner, whose players
donned pads for the frst
time this preseason. “The
weather has been wonderful.
It’s not been overly hot like
most August practices are.
From that standpoint, I feel
like we’ve gotten more done
just because the heat hasn’t
been that bad. So, it’s been a
very productive week.”
Werner said there still
are tickets remaining for the
season opener at 5:30 p.m.
Sept. 4 against Alma, Ark.,
in the Hooten’s Classic at
Fort Smith [Ark.] Northside
High School.
“We’re also going to have
a table set up, selling tick-
ets to the Alma [Ark.] game
[in the Hooten’s Classic] as
folks still have a chance to
buy some,” he said.
The regular scrimmages
for the Pirates will be Friday
at Heavener, then Aug. 28
at Northeastern State Uni-
versity in Tahlequah against
host Tahlequah, Hilldale
and Wagoner — which is a
change from its originally-
scheduled Aug. 29 date.
PAGE 6A . . . SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 2014 Sports POTEAU DAILY NEWS
ATTN: WISTER SCHOOL PATRONS
We will be discussing details and answering
questions regarding the upcoming bond issue. We
encourage you to attend this meeting, with any
questions or concerns. School administrators will
be available to show the serious facility issues
that must soon be addressed.
If you cannot attend and have questions,
please call Superintendent Jerry Carpenter at
918-658-8234 or call Wister School:
918-655-3132
201 Logan St.
Wister, OK 74966
www.wister.k12.ok.us
P UB L I C F OR UM
WISTER SCHOOL CAFETORIUM
THURSDAY, AUG. 21 @ 6:30 P.M.
ELECTION: AUG. 26, 2014
GO WILDCATS!!!
Tickets still remain for
the Poteau Pirates’ football
season opener in the
Hooten’s Kickoff Classic
against Alma, Ark., at Fort
Smith [Ark.] Northside
High School at 5:30 p.m.
Sept. 4.
Tickets for adults and
students cost $7 per person,
while pre-schoolers will be
admitted for free.
For those wishing to
purchase tickets, call
Poteau coach Greg Werner
at (918) 839-4572 or come
by the high school or foot-
ball fieldhouse.
• • •
There will be a soccer
referee course and a soccer
referee re-certification
course administered today
at the Patrick Lynch Public
Library.
The course for those
wishing to become soccer
referees for the first time
will take place from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. with lunch from
noon to 1 p.m. The cost is
$60.
The course for referees
wishing to get their re-cer-
tification will take place
from 4:30 to 7 p.m. There
will be no cost for those
currently certified.
For additional informa-
tion and to print the courses
booklets, go to www.oksoc-
cer.com.
If older than age 18, a
background check will
need to be done.
• • •
There will be a soccer
referees meeting at 5:30
p.m. Monday at The Coffee
Cup. The main item on the
agenda will be getting pre-
pared for the fall season,
which will take place from
Sept. 6 through Nov. 8.
• • •
The Poteau Cross
Country Booster Club will
meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday
at Sherman Floyd
Fieldhouse. Parents of all
runners are encouraged to
attend.
• • •
Registration for the fall
season for the LeFlore
County Youth Soccer
Association will end
Wednesday.
For those who signed up
to be coaches, there will be
a coaches meeting next
Friday at the Patrick Lynch
Public Library.
Practices will begin Aug.
25 with the first games of
league play beginning Sept.
6.
• • •
The 2014 Poteau Fall
Softball League and 2014
Poteau Fall Baseball
League are ready to regis-
ter teams for the upcoming
season.
In softball the age groups
will be ages 12-, 10- and
8-and-younger. The entry
fee for the 12-and-younger
division is $300 per team,
while the entry fee for the
other two divisions is $250
per team.
In baseball the age group
will be peewees and midget
divisions. The entry fee is
$300 per team.
Each league will have a
12-game schedule.
For additional informa-
tion, call Billy Bond at
(918) 647-1939.
• • •
There will be a fall
coach-pitch baseball league
at Heavener's Blues Park
that will play games on
Sundays duri ng
September.
For additional informa-
tion, call Bobby Pickle at
(918) 721-3492.
• • •
There will be two soft-
ball tournaments taking
place this fall at the Poteau
Area Recreational
Complex, one Sept. 13 and
the other on Oct. 6.
Each tournament will
feature three age divisions
of teams — ages 14-, 12-
and 10-and-younger — and
will all follow USSSA
rules.
Each tournament will
have a four-game guaran-
tee.
For additional informa-
tion, call Dale Lowrimore
at (918) 839-7771 or go
online to www.usssa.com.
• • •
The Howe Lady Lions
basketball team is going to
have a pair of alumni bas-
ketball games tentatively
scheduled for Oct. 25 at the
Howe Gym. The game
times will be determined
later, but the games will
likely be afternoon and/or
night contests.
One game will be for
those past players who
played during the 6-on-6
era, while the second game
will be the more modern
5-on-5 style. Each game
will be alumni vs. alumni.
The cost will be $10 per
player. All proceeds will
benefit the Lady Lions'
basketball program For
additional information, call
Chris Brown at (918) 658-
8256 or go to the Howe
Lady Lions Basketball
Page on Facebook.
• • •
The Poteau Youth
Wrestling Club is having a
drawing for a Ruger 243
rifle on Nov. 8. Tickets cost
$5 each or a block of five
for $20.
All proceeds will help
fund the organization’s
attempt to bring Mike
Krause to town for a wres-
tling camp, but a total of at
least 600 tickets must be
purchased in order to make
it possible for Krause to
come.
For additional informa-
tion, go to the oranization’s
Facebook page.
Sports Briefs
918-649-4910
Call for More Info
Let the sun shine in!
ama pitcher Hannah Goines (1-0) pitched a
two-hitter with nine strikeouts.
Kendra Swindle doubled, while Mikah
Rothermel, McKenzie Harper and Jami West
all singled for the Lady Razorbacks (1-0).
West and Madison Tackett each scored two
runs, while Calista Buckley, Sydnee Haynes
and Brittnie Brassfeld each scored once.
In defeat, Mariah Frederick was 1-for-3
with a double, while Breanna Gibson was
1-for-2. Lexey Branscum took the loss, pitch-
ing the frst four innings with two strikeouts
and allowing a hit.
Editor’s note: Nothing was reported on
Panama’s Thursday home game against
Quinton by press time.
SOFTBALL
POTEAU
Cowboys' D leaves camp
with even more questions
OXNARD, Calif. (AP)
— Morris Claiborne is
likely to skip another pre-
season game, Brandon Carr
isn't close to full speed after
missing two weeks of train-
ing camp and Orlando Scan-
drick is out for the frst four
games of 2014 for a drug
suspension.
And cornerback isn't the
only unsettled position for
Dallas' shaky defense.
The Cowboys are com-
ing home from camp in
California with even more
questions about the league's
most porous defense than
when they left Texas three
weeks ago.
Claiborne is just the latest
issue after missing the pre-
season opener with knee ten-
dinitis. Now he has a shoul-
der injury that kept him out
of the fnal camp practice
Thursday and was likely to
sideline him for the exhibi-
tion home opener Saturday
night against Baltimore.
"If a guy is not out there,
that's not a good thing for
our team, but it does provide
opportunity for other guys
to get reps," coach Jason
Garrett said.
"We have certainly had a
lot of younger players get the
opportunity to show us what
they can do, and that's good
for your football team."
Carr had an extended ab-
sence to be with his mother
in the fnal days of her battle
with breast cancer before she
died a week into camp. He
doesn't fgure to play against
the Ravens, but should be
ready when the regular sea-
son starts Sept. 7 against San
Francisco.
Scandrick won't play
against the 49ers because of
a four-game ban for violating
the league's policy on per-
formance-enhancing drugs.
The Cowboys are trying to
get him as much preparation
time as possible before he
has to stop practicing at the
end of the preseason.
A revamped defensive
line is missing the two big-
gest offseason acquisitions
— free agent tackle Henry
Melton and rookie defensive
end DeMarcus Lawrence, a
second-round pick.
Melton, who is coming
off a knee injury that side-
lined him most of last season
in Chicago, is dealing with a
groin injury but expects to
play in the third preseason
game at Miami. Lawrence
is expected to miss at least
half the season with a bro-
ken foot.
'America's Team' scrimmages Baltimore tonight at home
CLASSIC
Jay's 2-run double lifts
Cardinals over Padres
ST. LOUIS (AP) — Pinch-hitter Jon Jay
wasn't choosy when he came up to bat for
the Cardinals in the eighth inning.
Jay delivered a two-run double on the frst
pitch and right felder Shane Robinson threw
out the potential tying run at the plate in the
ninth to help St. Louis hold off the San Di-
ego Padres 4-3 Thursday night.
"I was trying to be aggressive," Jay said.
"I wanted something over the plate I could
handle. I was able to do that."
Jhonny Peralta hit an early two-run hom-
er for the Cardinals, who moved ahead of
Pittsburgh into second place in the NL Cen-
tral. St. Louis remained two games behind
division-leading Milwaukee.
San Diego had its fve-game winning
streak snapped and fell to 16-9 since the All-
Star break.
Trailing by two in the ninth, the Padres
loaded the bases with one out against closer
Trevor Rosenthal. Pinch-hitter Jake Goeb-
bert came through with an RBI single to
right, but Alexi Amarista was cut down at
home when he tried to score from second.
The replay review lasted 4:09. Padres
manager Bud Black then was ejected by
plate umpire Bob Davidson for continuing
to argue the call.
Cardinals catcher A.J. Pierzynski, who
entered in the ninth, disagreed.
"I thought I got his arm," Pierzynski said.
"I couldn't hear Bob. It was a big play in the
game for sure."
Resist the urge to compare
yourself with others. Stick to
your agenda and don't feel that
you have to keep up appearanc-
es. Questioning your actions or
being overly emotional can pre-
vent you from having a realistic
point of view. Get down to busi-
ness in order to succeed.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Don't let emotional issues ham-
per your work. Mooning over per-
sonal disappointments will cause
you to fall behind, making you
appear to be unprofessional. Do
your best; success is the sweetest
revenge.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Your game plan will work out
better if you are secretive about it.
The element of surprise will be
the determining factor that will
propel you into a better position.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
Don't hesitate to form a partner-
ship. You will be inspired by an
offhand comment or suggestion.
Express your thoughts and plans
with passion, and you will gain
support.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
Work issues will prove difficult
if your emotions get in the way.
Avoid hasty outbursts or accusa-
tions. Be conscientious in order to
gain the support of the people who
matter most.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 23-Dec. 21)
Avoid an unsavory situation
with anyone in an authoritative
position. If the grass looks greener
on the other side of the fence, it's
likely that someone is coloring
your view to manipulate you.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Follow through with your plans.
If you become sidetracked, you
will lose ground. You will capture
the interest of someone who has
much to contribute to your suc-
cess.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
Romance and relationships
should take top priority. Express
your desires honestly and be clear
regarding your intentions and
dreams. You can build a strong
and stable future.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
You will feel the need to make
personal changes. If someone in
your life is causing you grief,
stress or worry, consider taking a
time-out to reflect on the state of
the relationship.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
Your charisma will gain you
favorable attention. Get out, min-
gle and enjoy being in the spot-
light. You have the winning touch
today and you should make the
most of your popularity.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Your stubbornness can lead to
difficulties. Rather than get frus-
trated with friends or family, spend
time doing your own thing. Mull
over what's transpired and let it
go.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Don't let anyone hold you back.
Rely on your knowledge and abil-
ity to get ahead. Act on your
instinct, and refrain from believ-
ing everything you hear.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
You need to take care of your
responsibilities. An important
opportunity will slip through your
fingers if you are too distracted by
emotional issues to pay attention
to what really matters.
HOROSCOPE
THATABABY
©
by Paul Trap
BIG NATE
©
by Lincoln Peirce
KIT ‘N’ CARLYLE
©
by Larry Wright
ARLO & JANIS
©
by Jimmy Johnson
FRANK & ERNEST
©
by Bob Thaves
THE BORN LOSER
©
by Art and Chip Sansom
THE GRIZZWELLS
©
by Bill Schorr
MONTY
©
by Jim Meddick
ALLEY OOP
©
by Jack and Carole Bender HERMAN
©
by Jim Unger
Saturday, August 16, 2014
Saturday, August 16, 2014
Today is the 228th day of 2014
and the 57th day of summer.
TODAY'S HISTORY: In 1861,
President Abraham Lincoln pro-
hibited Union states from trading
with states that had seceded.
In 1896, gold was discovered
near the Klondike River in Canada's
Yukon Territory, sparking a gold
rush.
In 1977, Elvis Presley died at
age 42.
In 2007, U.S. citizen Jose Padilla
was convicted of conspiracy in a
"dirty bomb" terrorism case and
sentenced to more than 17 years in
prison.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS: T.E.
Lawrence (of Arabia) (1888-1935),
soldier/archaeologist/writer; George
Meany (1894-1980), union leader;
Charles Bukowski (1920-1994),
poet/writer; Ann Blyth (1928- ),
actress; Eydie Gorme (1928-2013),
singer/actress; Frank Gifford (1930-
), sportscaster/football player; Kathie
Lee Gifford (1953- ), actress/TV
personality; James Cameron (1954-
), film director; Angela Bassett
(1958- ), actress; Madonna (1958-
), singer/actress; Steve Carell
(1962- ), actor/comedian.
TODAY'S FACT: An 18-year-
old Elvis Presley paid a private
recording studio $4 in 1953 to
record "My Happiness" and "That's
When Your Heartache Begins" on a
two-sided record as a belated birth-
day gift to his mother.
TODAY'S SPORTS: In 1954,
the first issue of Sports Illustrated
was published.
TODAY'S QUOTE: "An intel-
lectual is a man who says a simple
thing in a difficult way; an artist is
a man who says a difficult thing in
a simple way." — Charles Bukowski,
"Notes of a Dirty Old Man"
TODAY'S NUMBER: 102,800
— height (in feet) from which Joseph
Kittinger jumped during a record-
setting U.S. Air Force experiment on
this day in 1960. Though his height
and speed records were broken dur-
ing the Red Bull Stratos project in
2012, Kittinger's 4 minutes, 36 sec-
onds of free fall remains unsur-
passed.
TODAY'S MOON: Between full
moon (Aug. 10) and last quarter
moon (Aug. 17).
Q: I was reading a Western
novel in which the main charac-
ter got caught in a wash during a
torrential rainfall. He was unable
to get to safety; a log came
along, which he climbed on and
rode to safety as if riding a buck-
ing horse. The author used a
word to describe the way he was
sitting, but I can't remember it.
Do you know? — J.S.J., Panama
City, Florida
A: Look up the word
"bestride." The dictionary gives
this definition: "to sit or stand on
with the legs astride."
Q: I was reading about gon-
dolas. It said a gondola is pro-
pelled by an oar rather than punt-
ing. What is "punting"? — L.L.,
Pottsville, Pennsylvania
A: A punt is a flat-bottomed
boat with a square bow and stern;
they are used in shallow waters.
To propel a punt, a pole is used
to push against the riverbed.
Now, who is doing this work?
The punter, of course. Gondoliers
use oars instead of poles.
Q: What does "blimey" mean,
and what is its origin? — P.H.,
Midland, Texas
A: "Blimey" is a British cry
of surprise, alarm or annoyance.
It's shortened from "gorblimey,"
which is the Cockney form of
"God blind me." In medieval
times, people would use contrac-
tions rather than break the third
commandment of using the
Lord's name in vain.
Q: Why are the nautical
mile and land mile different?
Which is longer? — T.L.,
Lawrence, Kansas
A: The nautical mile is a
unit of distance that is approx-
imately one minute of arc
measured along any meridian
(a line of longitude, stretching
from pole to pole). By interna-
tional agreement, it has been
set at exactly 1,852 meters
(about 6,076 feet).
The familiar land mile,
also known as a statue mile, is
5,280 feet, and is based on
paces. In 1593, an English Act
of Parliament defined a mile as
eight furlongs, which after lots
of measuring, comes out to
5,280 feet, or about 1,609
meters.
ASK MR. KNOW-IT-ALL
By Gary
Clothier
Humphrey Bogart
PAGE 7A . . . SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 2014 Entertainment POTEAU DAILY NEWS
By
Eugenia Last
Get the
latest
agriculture
news every
Thursday in
your PDN
PAGE 8A . . . SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 2014
Area
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
WISTER SCHOOLS
EXCELLENCE I N VOCATI ONAL AGRI CULTURE
Wister HS FFA chapter of Wister, Oklahoma, named
Three Star Chapter for 2014 National Chapter
award by National FFA Organization
INDIANAPOLIS (Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014/National FFA Organization) - The Wister HS
FFA Chapter of Wister, Oklahoma, has been recognized in the 2014 National Chapter
Award Program from the National FFA Organization.
The program recognizes outstanding FFA chapters from throughout the country that
successfully complete an annual set of required activities that encourage members to
grow as individuals, work as a team and serve others in their communities.
Chapters that received star ratings during judging July 27-Aug 1 will be recognized at
the 2014 National FFA Convention & Expo, Oct. 29-Nov. 1 in Louisville, Ky.
All star FFA chapters receive honors made possible by corporate sponsor John Deere
as a special project of the National FFA Foundation.
“Feeding some 9 billion people by mid-century brings with it unprecedented challeng-
es for today’s farmers,” said Amy Allen, manager, national corporate contributions for
John Deere. “The skills and experiences learned though the National Chapter Awards
programs will help meet the critical needs.”
The National FFA Organization provides leadership, personal growth and career suc-
cess training through agricultural education to 579,678 student members in grades
seven through 12 who belong to one of 7,570 local FFA chapters throughout the U.S.,
Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

About National FFA Organization
The National FFA Organization is a national youth organization of 579,678 student members as part of 7,570 local FFA chapters in all 50
states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The FFA mission is to make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their
potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. The National FFA Organization
operates under a federal charter granted by the 81st United States Congress and it is an integral part of public instruction in agricul-
ture. The U.S. Department of Education provides leadership and helps set direction for FFA as a service to state and local agricultural
education programs. For more, visit the National FFA Organization online at www.ffa.org, on Facebook, Twitter and the official National
FFA Organization blog.
Back Row Left to Right: Mary Stewart - VP, Stephanie Seyler - Secretary, Matthew Duschel - Reporter, James Marshall Jr - Advisor
Front Row Left to Right: Bailie Hamlin - President, Gianna Reid - Jr Advisor, Dakota Moore - Sentinel, Sydney Davison - Treasurer
CONGRATULATIONS WISTER FFA!
-WISTER PUBLIC SCHOOL BOARD OF EDUCATION, FACULTY & STAFF
Cancun with the family — a trip to remember
The picture with this
article shows a very impor-
tant reason why I went on a
recent trip to Mexico.
My wife, Sally, is push-
ing and three of my grands
are riding on Papa’s wheel
chair. Sally and my son,
Wes, didn’t enjoy having to
wait on me everywhere we
went so they pushed me in
a wheelchair to help me
keep up. It also helped me
load and unload off the
plane. My gait has slowed
and aches and pains have
certainly hampered my
movement as age creeps up
on me.
Amber, Russell and even
Mia and Tripp wanted to
help out as they could.
Some of you reading this
can perhaps sympathize
with me. My grands enjoyed
hanging onto the wheel-
chair and I probably would
not have attempted another
plane ride so soon, but I try
to spend as much time as
practical with some of my
eight grands when I have
opportunity. Amber, Rus-
sell and Dee Raines also
were on the trip. Dee (or
NeNe, as the grands refer
to her) was a very helpful
companion as she is their
babysitter during school
days. Of course papa Rusty,
as Russel is called, is help-
ful too.
We landed at the Cancun
airport and rode more than
an hour down the Yucatan
Peninsula to our resort at
Riviera, Maya. It is a very
large, well-maintained
resort on the beautiful
waters of the Caribbean
Sea. We could look out our
ground floor room to the
sea not many steps away.
There also was a very large
swimming pool area for all
ages, even mine.
There was a time back in
my Blue Hole days that I
swam very well. I can still
swim, but my stroke is
noticeably more labored
and tonnage more. There
were water slides for chil-
dren and especially young-
er children.
We also swam in the
Caribbean Sea. You can’t
just sit down in the surf
because it was hard to sit as
the waves kept rolling in
and would move you
around. It was sparkling
blue-green water.
You could act like you
were rich because you had
invested your finances in
the cruise and you could eat
or drink anytime you liked.
The food at the airports, the
tips you feel you should
acknowledge and souvenirs
increase expenses. Anyway,
it will be a very rare thing
for me.
It was a nice trip, but
every time the plane shud-
dered or was buffeted by
turbulence I held my breath.
Mia is growing up too fast
and did something that sur-
prised all of us. She petted
and held a dolphin. She
was asked to swim out into
the pool by herself. The
trainer sent the dolphin out
to her and told her to take
hold of the flippers on each
side and she rode on the
dolphin’s back across the
pool. Everyone watching
cheered as she did so well
and I beamed with pride
along with Amber, Wes,
Sally, Russell and Dee.
Even Tripp was proud of
his sister.
And of course we got a
movie of her riding the dol-
phin across the water. I
don’t know that I would
have done it and only a few
others in her group would.
On the trip over it was
cloudy and we mostly saw
the tops of clouds, but com-
ing back in the night from
Atlanta to Oklahoma City
we saw lights of small
towns and highways, even
the top of a large thunder-
head in the distance which
put on quite a light show.
We arrived at Will Rog-
ers Airport around 9:45
p.m. on Aug. 5. Oklahoma
City was a beautiful and
welcome sea of lights. We
drove home, arriving at 1
a.m. on the 6th. The bed
really felt good. It is a thrill-
ing anticipation to go but
perhaps a better feeling to
arrive back home safe and
sound. There is no place
like home sweet home.
Greg McGowen is a
retired educator and long-
time resident of the Fan-
shawe area.
Observations
from Fanshawe
Greg McGowen
Thank You to the Morrisons
for purchasing a new custom built
home in Poteau.
AREA MUSIC NOTES
By Virginia Sanders
There was good music as always at the
Howe Music Hall on Monday.
We really enjoy being here with friends.
Come and be with us and enjoy the music.
Just listen, play or sing.
We had Connie Cabe here. She is really
good. It has been a long time since she has
been here.
Our performers were Oscar Pharis of
Poteau, Tommy Norwood of Monroe,
Dorthy Pharis of Poteau, Jo Morris of
Howe, Virginia Sanders of Monroe, Tom
Armstrong of Poteau, Vernon Johnson Jr.
of Dog Creek, John W. Sanders of Mon-
roe, David McNair of Poteau, Vernon
Johnson Sr. of Dog Creek, Jimmy Duni-
gan Sr. and Jimmy Dunigan Jr. of Heav-
ener and Connie Cabe from Hodgen.
Our pot luck was pinto beans, cornbread,
turkey and dressing, apple pie and muffins.
Thanks to our cooks. We enjoy the food.
There is music at Poteau on Saturday
and Monday, Heavener on Friday and
Howe on Mondays. They all start at 6 p.m.
Everyone’s welcome.
Remember the veterans, troops and
their families. They all need our prayers.
Virginia Sanders is a longtime member
and performer with the Howe Music Hall.
The free music show is held at 6 p.m. every
Monday in the old Howe Music Hall.
By Dottie Wilcox
It was good to see every-
one Saturday night. It sure
looked like everyone was
having a very fun evening,
The entertainers for the
evening were Wayne
Wilcox,Tom Goforth, D.B.
Lampkin, Albert Owen,
Dorthy Pharis Oscar Pharis,
Marie Davis, Carol Max-
well, Tom Armstrong,
Annette Turner, Bill Phelan,
Connie Cabe, Randy and
Judy Moore, Delbert Med-
ders, Pat Hunt, Linda Mat-
tox, Cecil Dixon, Bud Tal-
helm, Vernon Johnson Sr.,
Vernon Johnson Jr., Marilyn
Robertson, Denver Turner
and Jerry Sultuska.
Congratulations to the
two winners in the weekly
drawing this week — Carol
Maxwell and Dottie Wilcox.
Thanks to all who buy tick-
ets and support the weekly
drawings.
It was wonderful to see
Dorthy and Oscar Pharis
back with us. We are so
happy they made it back
safely from their vacation.
Special prayers are need-
ed for Red Earls. He is in
Sparks Hospital in Fort
Smith. Hope he will get
well soon and return to the
Jamboree
On Saturday Aug. 23,
there will be a benefit din-
ner and silent auction for
Red and Gerri Earls. It will
start at 6 p.m. at the Poteau
Valley Jamboree. The cost
will be $5 per person. Bring
a covered dish and some-
thing for the silent auction.
Remember the other
singings in the area. Mon-
day night there is singing at
Howe and Poteau. Friday
night there is singing at the
Lamplight Theatre in Heav-
ener. It is hosted by Denver
and Annette Turner.
We have a snack bar with
candy, chips crackers, pop,
water. regular and decaf cof-
fee. Coffee is free to the
ones playing in the band.
Hope that everyone has
a great week. We look for-
ward to seeing you again at
the Jamboree this week, and
remember to bring along
those friends.
Dottie Wilcox is a volun-
teer supporter of the Poteau
Valley Jamboree. The free
music show is held at 6 p.m.
every Saturday and Monday
at 305 S. McKenna St.
By Minnie Hamm
We again had a good
show Monday night. We
had good music, meal and
fellowship.
We missed those who
didn’t get to come. We hope
to see them next Monday
night.
Our musicians were Rich
Henry, Don Goad, Gary
and Judy Sizemore, George
Mott and Denver Turner.
They did a real good
job.
Our performers were
Annette Turner, Marilyn
Scott, Carol Maxwell, Min-
nie Hamm, Marie Davis,
George Mott, Crissy Keeton,
Tresia Farrington, Don Goad,
Rich Henry, Gary and Judy
Sizemore, Jess and Arlene
Goodman, Harvey Wyle,
Johnnie and Pat Wann, Con-
nie Cal and Ione Place.
Our meal was beans and
cornbread, fried okra, mac
and cheese, meat loaf, stew,
cabbage, stewed tomatoes,
potato salad, lasagna,
squash, sweet potatoes,
peach cobbler, cake, pie
and corn, I probably forgot
something — if so, please
forgive me.
Thanks a lot to all of our
good cooks. We really
appreciate you.
Don’t forget to go to the
other music shows: Friday
night at Heavener, Saturday
at Poteau, Monday night at
Howe and Poteau.
Come see us.
Minnie Hamm is a long-
time member and perform-
er at area music jamborees
including the Poteau Valley
Jamboree which began a
second night of singing
Monday’s at 6:30 p.m.
Howe Music Hall
Poteau Valley Jamboree
Monday Night Jamboree
Greg and Sally McGowen and grandchildren
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