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August 19, 2014

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Christian Essandoh with Roger Mattox. Submitted photo
‘Like coming to your roots’
Ghanaian minister visits home church in Poteau
By Amanda Corbin
PDN Reporter
“Coming [to Oklahoma]
is like coming to your
roots,” said Christian
Essandoh, Assemblies of
God superintendent of cen-
tral region of Ghana in West
Africa, in relation to visit-
ing the state where the min-
istry that has helped him is
located.
“We look back to the
United States — this is
where it began.”
Essandoh has spent the
last month visiting Poteau
and the surrounding areas.
Since his arrival, Essan-
doh has spoken at several
local churches across the
county in Poteau, Wister,
Spiro, Panama and Wilbur-
ton as well as Fort Smith,
Ark.
Essandoh, 52, is a minis-
ter for Emmanuel Assem-
blies of God in Swedru,
Ghana, and also works as
the regional superintendent
over 263 churches.
His church holds a
400-person parish but usu-
ally fills to 500; Essandoh
would like to expand and
fit 1,000.
He is married with two
children and is the third
sibling of 18 children.
Before joining the min-
istry, Essandoh worked as a
newspaper reporter from
1992 to 1996.
He said joining the min-
istry was a spiritual experi-
ence and that he “always
believed that God satisfies
the hunger and spirit of his
people.”
Spiro school
official jailed
Principal arrested for DUI,
firearm possession, open beer
By Kim Ross
PDN Editor
A Spiro educator was
arrested Monday on alcohol
and gun-related charges.
Tracy Stuart Saling, 50, of
Bokoshe was booked into
the LeFlore County Deten-
tion Center on suspicion of
driving under the influence
of alcohol, possession of a
firearm while intoxicated
and transporting an open
container.
According to Poteau
police Sgt. Gary Hecht, at
11:07 p.m. he was driving
north on
Br oadway
near Walmart
when he saw
Saling’s red
Dodge pick-
up travel
across the
center line
several times. Hecht reported
while following Saling, he
saw the truck drive into part
of the outside lane then into
the inside lane. The arrest
report shows Saling turned
on his right turn signal then
Lawyer named
for Humphries
By Kim Ross
PDN Editor
A Monroe man accused
of murdering his neighbor
appeared in court Tues-
day.
Ri chard Rol and
Humphries, 48, was
charged in the shooting
death of 53-year-old
neighbor Randy Shelton.
Humphries appeared
before Special Judge Jeff
Singer in the LeFlore
County District Court for
criminal proceedings and
the assignment of defense
counsel. After a brief
discussion with District
Attorney Jeff Smith and
Poteau attorney Rob
Cowan about the lack of a
capital defense attorney or
a non-capital defense
attorney with the
Oklahoma Indigent
Defense System to
represent Humphries,
Singer left the stand to
Shannon dela Cruz of the Poteau Chamber of Commerce prepares dye packets
for the Chamber of Commerce Walk, Run or Dye 5k, which is slated for Sept. 6.
The deadline to enter the event has been extended to Tuesday. To register contact
the Chamber in the Donald W. Reynolds Community Center, (918) 647-9178 or
online at www.poteauchamber.com. PDN photo by David Seeley
Fit to be Dyed
Mother seeks missing twins
By Ken Milam
PDN News Editor
A LeFlore County mother is seeking
help in locating her 15-year-old twin
daughters, who have been missing since
Saturday.
Angela Delao of Heavener said her
daughters, Jasmine and Jessica, were
last seen when their grandmother dropped
them at a day care center in Talihina
about 2 p.m. to meet some friends.
When the grandmother returned about
an hour later, the girls were nowhere to
be found, Delao said.
The mother said she contacted Talihina
Police to ask for their help.
Delao said the girls left a note
Jasmine and Jessica Delao
(See GHANA, page 2)
(See PRINCIPAL, page 2)
(See SLAYING, page 2)
(See MISSING, page 2)
75¢ Daily Edition Volume 119 No. 37 16 Pages
The Jay Falkner Band Jams in Poteau
• 9 Pocola Football,
Tri-State Speedway
• 3 Weather, Calendar, Obituaries
• 4 Opinions
• 5 Agriculture
• 6 Lifestyles
• 10-13 Comics, Classifieds
• 15, 16 Education, State News
• 7 Hi gh School Basebal l , Softbal l , Sports Bri efs
• 8 Arkoma, Panama, Spi ro Footbal l
Also Inside:
Atwood’s
Marvin’s IGA
2013
BETTER
NEWSPAPER CONTEST
AWARD WINNER
Presented by the
OKLAHOMA PRESS
ASSOCIATION
SERVING LEFLORE COUNTY PoteauDailyNews.com Wednesday, August 20, 2014 SERVING LEFLORE COUNTY
Saling
PAGE 2 . . . WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014
Area
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
PRINCIPAL
I am asking for your vote on Aug. 26 for
LeFlore County Assessor.
I have my initial accreditation and
advanced accreditation.
I have 21 years of experience
in the assessor’s office.
This office is very important to schools,
county government, EMS, libraries, cities
and vocational schools in our county.
We need to keep experience in this office.
Elect Brenda Cockburn
LeFlore County Assessor
VOTE AUG. 26
Pai d for by Brenda Cockburn.
For lives
For jobs
By votng Yes on August 26th, you are saying Yes to:
·Over 250 jobs related to our community
·Millions of dollars spent directly and indirectly in our local economy
·A key factor to economic development and job growth
·Access to quality healthcare right here in our community
·Additonal births to the already 16,000+ healthy babies delivered
·And most importantly, when minutes mater, EOMC is there, ready to help
Not printed at tax payer’s expense
COMMUNITY
BULLETIN BOARD
“God’s Not Dead”
The Youth Group of Sugarloaf Christian
Fellowship will present the movie, “God’s Not
Dead,” Sunday, Aug. 24.
A hamburger dinner will be served before
the movie. We are asking for a $3 donation for
the movie and a $3 donation for the dinner. All
proceeds will go to the World Vision 30-Hour
Famine Collection Fund Drive.
Dinner will start at 5 p.m. and the movie will
start at 6 p.m. Everyone is invited.
CORRECTION
In the Tuesday edition page 1 story “Wann Ranch
named top in state,” it should have stated the Wann
Ranch holds one annual sale in the spring. PDN
regrets the error.
It was through Oasis International Ministries, based in
Poteau, that Essandoh was able to attend school. He has
received his master’s in divinity in theological seminary
in Holland, where he spent five years.
“We helped him go to Bible school and now look at
where he is today,” said Roger Mattox, president and
founder of Oasis International Ministries in Poteau.
Oasis started in 2001. It has a board of nine members
and does mission work in Ghana and Libya, although its
headquarters is in Poteau.
The ministry has built a total 29 churches in Ghana,
according to Mattox, and runs on donations from church-
es, businesses and individuals.
While visiting this area, Essandoh visited Cavanal
Hill, Wister Lake and has gone to Texas, Oklahoma,
Arkansas and Missouri, with the reception from locals in
Poteau a positive experience, he said.
After leaving Poteau, Essandoh plans to stay a short
time in New York to visit with friends. On his return to
Ghana, he will continue to work as a minister, regional
superintendent and as a bible school instructor at the
same school he attended Bible school.
his left several times before Hecht
pulled him over.
Hecht said when he spoke with Sal-
ing he noticed the man’s movements
were slow, speech slurred and he
smelled of alcohol. When Saling got
out of his truck as ordered by Hecht, the
officer reported he was unsteady on his
feet.
Hecht said he arrested Saling for
suspicion of driving under the influ-
ence at which time Saling admitted to
drinking. Hecht reported he found an
open beer in the passenger floor of the
truck along with several unopen beers.
According to the arrest report, Sal-
ing, who informed the officer he had a
hand gun license, also said he had a
.40-caliber pistol inside the truck. Hecht
reported he found a loaded Browning
Arms .40-caliber pistol with 10 rounds
in the magazine and one in the chamber
underneath the driver’s seat.
Saling reportedly submitted to an
alcohol breath test, testing more than
three times the legal limit at 0.29.
Saling was released from jail Tues-
day after posting $1,000 bail.
Spiro Superintendent Don Atkinson
was unable to comment on any disci-
plinary action Saling may face in con-
nection with his arrest, saying it was a
personnel matter.
According to the Spiro Public
Schools website, Saling is the high
school principal. Saling also is the
school’s athletic director. Saling has
coached and taught at other schools in
the county including Poteau and report-
edly Panama.
Saling has not been charged by the
LeFlore County District Attorney’s
Office but could face felony charges for
the firearm and his reported blood alco-
hol level which tested above the aggra-
vated factor making driving under the
influence a felony, according to Poteau
police.
contact OIDS by phone. Upon his
return, Singer appointed Poteau
attorney Douglas Schmuck to
represent Humphries.
With the attorney formalities
tended, a competency hearing for
Humphries, who has been ordered
to undergo an evaluation, was
scheduled for Aug. 21 at 2:30 p.m.
If Humphries is found competent to
stand trial, criminal proceedings
will continue with a preliminary
hearing the next expected court
appearance.
Court records show Humphries
allegedly shot Shelton at about 3:30
a.m. July 9 at Shelton’s home on
Midway Road in Monroe. Humphries
reportedly told a relative about 10
p.m. July 8 “He [Humphries] was
going to kill someone tonight and
was not afraid to blow their head
off.”
The records show witnesses told
Oklahoma State Bureau of Investi-
gation Special Agent Shawn Ward
that Humphries had been told Shel-
ton did not like him because
Humphries was always shooting
[guns] and yelling at his residence.
The witnesses said since then,
Humphries had been angry with
Shelton and told a relative he would
like to shoot Shelton, according to
the affidavit.
Ward reported Humphries said
he had been driving his car, a dark
red Chevrolet Aveo, around the area
during the middle of the night.
While driving around, Humphries
allegedly had a .357-caliber mag-
num revolver in the car with him as
well as Winchester brand ammuni-
tion. Ward reported Humphries also
had extra bullets in his pocket.
Humphries reportedly told Ward
during the night he got his vehicle
stuck and had to walk back to his
home. Humphries carried his pistol
with him during the walk, shooting
an armadillo on the way home,
according to court records.
When he arrived home, his broth-
er returned with him to get the
vehicle, then Humphries went home,
changed clothes and again drove
around the area. Ward reported
Humphries’ brother asked him when
he later returned home if he had
shot his gun, and Humphries alleg-
edly said he had shot at an arma-
dillo.
The court records show
Humphries gave investigators the
Smith and Wesson .357 magnum
revolver and the bullets in his pants
pockets. Humphries allegedly
denied going to Shelton’s residence
the morning of the murder. A bal-
listics test linked the gun to Shel-
ton’s shooting, according to court
records.
Reports show Shelton had gotten
up to go to work at about 3:30 a.m.
to go to work. His wife, who was
asleep, heard several loud noises
that sounded like gunshots. When
she went into the kitchen she found
Shelton lying on the floor. His wife
called 911 and looked out the win-
dow when she saw headlights in the
yard, according to court records.
Records show she saw a small dark
colored car pulling down their
driveway.
Ward’s report shows Humphries
allegedly shot several times through
the east door of the Shelton’s home,
several of those bullets striking
Shelton in the chest and arm, killing
him.
Humphries’ car was seized by
investigators after learning the car
was equipped with a memory stor-
age device that provides GPS relat-
ed activity, tracking the where-
abouts of the car, according to court
records. No further information
about the review of the storage
device has been reported.
Humphries was arrested on July
9 and on July 11 was charged with
first-degree murder. He is being
held in the LeFlore County Deten-
tion Center without bond.
SLAYING
GHANA
indicating they were
leaving, but gave no
further information. She
said the girls’ friends said
they had not seen them.
They were scheduled to
enroll at Heavener Schools
Monday.
The girls were last seen
wearing T-shirts and jeans
and took no extra clothing
or money and did not have
cell phones.
They are described as
5-foot 3 inches tall, about
149 pounds with dark
brown hair, blue eyes and
freckles. Jessica’s hair has
a reddish-orange tint from
a previous coloring, their
mother said.
Anyone wi t h
information about the
girls’ whereabouts is asked
to call Talihina police at
(918) 567-2620 or Delao
at (918) 942-8460.
MISSING
Earl Heron, left,
joins Jay Falkner
on stage during
Falkner’s concert
at the Donald W.
Reynolds
Community
Center
amphitheater
Saturday night.
PDN photo
by Amanda Corbin
Teaming Up
Got News?
Call the PDN at (918) 647-3188
DEATH NOTICES
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
Area
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014 . . . PAGE 3
Let the sun shine in!
1509 S. McKenna, Poteau • www.ktc.edu
647-4525 • 1-888-567-6632
Become a fan on FACEBOOK/kiamichitechcenters-poteau
WE ACCEPT MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, VISA AND AMERICAN EXPRESS
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KTC, Poteau Campus is offering a series of short- term
night classes during the 2014-15 school year!
EARN NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED Certifications
in any of the following classes!!!
• Auto Service Technology
• Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning
• Welding Technology
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ENROLL for the Classes at the following times:
MON. August 18, 2014 at 5:15 p.m.
TUES., August 19, 2014 at 5:15 p.m.
THURS. August 21, 2014 at 5:15 p.m .
Tuition: $ 1.25 per hr.—No Finanacial Aid Available
Scotty James Loyd
Scotty James Loyd, 55, of Summerfield
died Sunday, Aug. 17, 2014, in Summer-
field. Scotty was born June 10, 1959, at
Fort Sill to Curtis C. and Reba L. (Cox)
Loyd. He worked for the Choctaw Nation.
Scotty was preceded in death by his moth-
er and sister-in-law, Linda Loyd. He was a
member of the Summerfield Church of
Christ where he was the song leader for
over 20 years. Scotty loved to fish, float fish and ride his
Gold Wing. Scotty always remembered birthdays with a
card.
Survivors include his father, Curtis; siblings, Peggy
and Jerry Wiser, Ray Loyd, Stanley and Janice Loyd,
Tracy and Daphne Loyd all of Summerfield; numerous
nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends.
Services will be 2 p.m., Friday, Aug. 22, at Summer-
field Church of Christ with Curtis Curry officiating. Pall-
bearers will be Eugene Loyd, Toney Patterson, Wesley
Williams, Lonnie Wayne Williams, Mike Cox, Joseph
Cox. Honorary pallbearers will be Stephen Wiser, Leon-
ard Earls and Christopher Loyd.
Evans and Miller Funeral Home, Poteau, is handling
arrangements.
Bob Warren
Bob Warren, 74, of Talihina died Thursday, Aug. 14,
2014, in Little Rock, Ark.
Memorial services will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday,
Aug. 20, at the Talihina First Assembly of God under the
direction of Burkhart Funeral Services.
Today is Lemonade Day
• TODAY — PPubl i c
meeting concerning pro-
posed sales tax for
Eastern Oklahoma
Medical Center, 7 p.m.,
Wister School cafetori-
um.
— Auditions for LeFlore
County talent show (ages
5-15), 5-9 p.m., Bob Lee
Kidd Civic Center.
Poteau High School.
• AUG. 21 — Auditions
for LeFlore County tal-
ent show (ages 16 and
older), 5-9 p.m., Bob Lee
Kidd Civic Center.
Poteau High School.
• AUG. 23 — Doug Byrd
family benefit pot luck
dinner, pie and silent
auctions, noon, $6 per
plate, proceeds to defray
medical and funeral
costs.
— LeFlore County talent
show, 2 p.m., Bob Lee
Kidd Civic Center.
Poteau High School.
— Third annual Dr. John
M o n t g o m e r y
Scholarship Banquet, 6
p.m, Donald W. Reynolds
Community Center in
Poteau. Info: Wesley
Hooks, (479) 420-3721.
— Brave the Mud run to
benefit Women’s Crisis
Services, 9 a.m., LeFlore
County Fairgrounds.
Info: Glenda Wise. (918)
839-4785 or glenda-
wise@windstream.net.
• AUG. 24 — The
McKameys in Concert, 6
p.m., doors open at 5
p.m., Panama First
Assembly of God, 204
N. Illinois, Panama.
_ Movie “God’s Not
Dead,” hamburgers din-
ner 5 p.m., movie 6 p.m.,
Sugarloaf Christian
Fellowship.
• AUG. 26 — ELECTION
DAY: primary runoffs,
proposed county sales
tax to support Eastern
Oklahoma Medical
Center, Wister and
Panama School bond
issues, polling places
open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
— Auditions for children’s
Treble Choir, 6:30 p.m.,
Poteau First United
Methodist Church., 109
S. Harper.
• AUG. 28 — Choctaw
Labor Day Festival prin-
cess pageant, 7 p.m.,
Tuskahoma. Info: www.
choctawnation.com.
— I n d i v i d u a l i z e d
Education Program train-
ing for parents and other
involved with children
with disabilities, 6 p.m.,
Carl Albert State College
Sallisaw campus. Info:
Kodey Toney, (918) 658-
5076 or pervasiveparent-
ing@hotmail.com.
• AUG. 29 — Choctaw
Labor Day Festival, 9
a.m. to approximately 11
p.m., Tuskahoma. Info:
www. choct awnat i on.
com.
• AUG. 30 — LeFlore
County Round-Up Club
play day, Cecil Leachman
Arena, Heavener. Info:
Frank Mode, (918) 839-
0330.
— Choctaw Labor Day
Festival, 9 a.m. to
approximately 11 p.m.,
Tuskahoma. Info: www.
choctawnation.com.
• AUG. 31 — Choctaw
Labor Day Festival, 7
a.m. to approximately 11
p.m., Tuskahoma. Info:
www. choct awnat i on.
com.
© 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Puzzle #3257-D
Difficult
1 2 3
4 5
6 4 7
2 8 6
9 7
3 5 1
7 8 6
9 4
8 1 5 2
Each puzzle is divided into
nine sections, and each section
has nine blank squares. Fill in all
81 squares on the puzzle with
numbers 1 to 9. You may not
repeat any numbers in any one of
the nine sections that you've
already used elsewhere in that
section. Also, you can use each
number 1-9 only once in each
horizontal line of nine squares,
and in each vertical column of
nine squares. The puzzle is com-
pleted when you correctly fill
every square. © 2009 Hometown Content
Sudoku Solution #3256-M
1 7 2 8 9 3 6 4 5
3 8 9 4 5 6 2 1 7
6 4 5 1 2 7 8 3 9
5 2 8 6 4 9 3 7 1
9 3 1 5 7 2 4 8 6
4 6 7 3 8 1 5 9 2
7 9 3 2 6 4 1 5 8
2 5 4 7 1 8 9 6 3
8 1 6 9 3 5 7 2 4
Solution to Aug. 19 puzzle
Today's Weather
Local 5-Day Forecast
Wed
8/20
95/73
Some
clouds in
the morning
will give way
to mainly
sunny skies
for the afte.
Sunrise:
6:42 AM
Sunset:
8:00 PM
Thu
8/21
94/75
Sunny.
Highs in the
mid 90s and
lows in the
mid 70s.
Sunrise:
6:43 AM
Sunset:
7:59 PM
Fri
8/22
97/73
Abundant
sunshine.
Highs in the
upper 90s
and lows in
the low 70s.
Sunrise:
6:44 AM
Sunset:
7:58 PM
Sat
8/23
98/73
Abundant
sunshine.
Highs in the
upper 90s
and lows in
the low 70s.
Sunrise:
6:44 AM
Sunset:
7:57 PM
Sun
8/24
99/71
Mainly
sunny.
Highs in the
upper 90s
and lows in
the low 70s.
Sunrise:
6:45 AM
Sunset:
7:55 PM
Oklahoma City
96/77
Tulsa
97/76
Lawton
98/73
Enid
98/74
Poteau
95/73
Oklahoma At A Glance
Area Cities
City Hi Lo Cond. City Hi Lo Cond.
Antlers 97 75 pt sunny Oklahoma City 96 77 mst sunny
Ardmore 96 76 pt sunny Okmulgee 95 74 mst sunny
Bartlesville 96 74 mst sunny Pauls Valley 96 75 mst sunny
Broken Bow 96 73 mst sunny Perry 97 75 mst sunny
Claremore 97 74 mst sunny Sallisaw 94 73 pt sunny
Cordell 98 75 windy Sapulpa 96 76 mst sunny
Duncan 98 75 mst sunny Shawnee 97 77 mst sunny
El Reno 96 74 mst sunny Snyder 99 75 mst sunny
Elk City 96 74 windy Stillwater 97 75 pt sunny
Enid 98 74 windy Tahlequah 93 72 pt sunny
Guymon 100 75 windy Tulsa 97 76 mst sunny
Lawton 98 73 mst sunny Watonga 97 75 windy
McAlester 95 75 pt sunny Weatherford 98 75 windy
Miami 96 75 mst sunny Wewoka 95 75 mst sunny
Muskogee 94 74 pt sunny Woodward 98 77 windy
National Cities
City Hi Lo Cond. City Hi Lo Cond.
Atlanta 93 72 pt sunny Minneapolis 87 69 mst sunny
Boston 77 59 sunny New York 81 66 sunny
Chicago 86 69 mst sunny Phoenix 93 74 sunny
Dallas 96 76 pt sunny San Francisco 66 59 pt sunny
Denver 84 58 t-storm Seattle 72 57 pt sunny
Houston 95 79 t-storm St. Louis 96 77 pt sunny
Los Angeles 80 62 pt sunny Washington, DC 88 71 rain
Miami 90 80 mst sunny
Moon Phases
Last
Aug 17
New
Aug 25
First
Sep 2
Full
Sep 9
UV Index
Wed
8/20
10
Very High
Thu
8/21
9
Very High
Fri
8/22
9
Very High
Sat
8/23
9
Very High
Sun
8/24
9
Very High
The UV Index is measured on a 0 - 11 number scale,
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.
0 11
©2010 American Profile Hometown Content Service
Douglas Neil Byrd
Douglas
Neil Byrd,
21, of Spiro
died Thurs-
day, Aug.
14, 2014, in
Tulsa.
D o u g
was born
Jan. 18, 1993, in Poteau to
Donald and Diana (Brad-
shaw) Byrd. He was man-
ager at Burger King. Doug
was preceded in death by
two sisters and brother,
Raven Byrd, Skylar Car-
penter and Hunter Pylant
Carpenter; grandfathers,
Hayden Byrd and Glen
Long.
Survivors include his
mother, Diana Wiles of the
home; father, Donald and
Cheree Byrd; brother, Bran-
don Mackey of Tennessee;
sisters; Stefanie and Jason
Ivey of Wister; Christyl
Morgan of the home; niece,
Stormie Ivey; grandmoth-
ers, Sue Nave of Poteau,
Brenda Long of California;
great grandparents, George
and Faye Weaver Panama,
Gnieve Benson of Marietta;
numerous aunts, uncles,
cousins, other relatives and
many, many friends.
Services will be held at 2
p.m. Thursday, Aug. 21, at
Shady Point School gym
with the Rev. Keith Wil-
liams and Mark Miller offi-
ciating. Burial will be in
Greenhill Cemetery, Cam-
eron. Pallbearers will be
Cameron Hollicross, Jessie
Smith, Jason Ivey, Brandon
Mackey, Chema Perez and
Steve Young. Honorary
pallbearers will be Reede
Thompson and C.J. Burks.
The family will visit
with relatives and friends
from 5-8 p.m. Wednesday
at Evans and Miller Funeral
Home, Poteau.
I’ve been getting a lot of email from Democratic fund-
raisers lately. They seem very worried about November’s
elections.
First came the highly publicized “Impeachment Red
Alert” campaign, in which the Democratic congressional
committee warned that Republicans will impeach President
Obama if they win control of the House and Senate. Though
much ridiculed, the “Impeachment Red Alert” effort was a
big winner, pulling in $2.1 million in small donations in a
single weekend.
Despite that success, House Minority Leader Nancy
Pelosi’s mood seemed to blacken in subsequent days as she
asked for more and more money. The subject line of Pelosi’s
next appeal was “Kiss all hope goodbye.” Her message was
that all will be lost for the remainder of Obama’s term if
Republican House Speaker John Boehner remains in
power.
Then came a missive with the subject line “Byron, I’m
pleading,” in which Pelosi pronounced herself “disgusted”
by the prospect of Republicans “dragging the president’s
good name through the mud.”
Later came “I’m pleading (again)” and “Bad news to
share” and “Please, Byron.” More than a little desperation
had crept into Pelosi’s tone. Each message noted that I
hadn’t sent any money, and the minority leader’s disappoint-
ment seemed to deepen by the day.
Vice President Joe Biden got in the game with a few
emails, although he didn’t grovel like Pelosi. Finally, Obama
himself began emailing. With everything the president of
the United States has on his plate right now, you’d think
he’d have more pressing things to do. Apparently not.
The president’s role is to apply a little discipline to unco-
operative prospective donors like me. “Nancy Pelosi has
emailed you,” Obama wrote. “Joe Biden has emailed you.
And now I’ve emailed you. We wouldn’t all be asking if it
wasn’t so important.” The message was clear: Get off your
butt and give us some money.
Twenty years ago, just before the Republicans’ stunning
victory in the 1994 Clinton midterms, I also received a
string of increasingly desperate-sounding mail — the paper
kind — from the Democratic Party. Curious to see how the
party was treating small donors, I contributed $10. After
that, I got a series of progressively worried entreaties; by
October 1994, Democratic fundraisers sounded as if they
knew disaster was on the way. Turned out it was.
That was my last political contribution until this week,
when, hoping to get a better look at Democrats’ small-donor
technique, I finally clicked the $5 contribution box on
Obama’s email.
You’d think that would have made them happy. But no
— they immediately wanted more.
First they tried to get me to increase my contribution. I
declined. Then they asked that I make my contribution an
automatic monthly donation. I declined. And then, when it
looked like $5 was all they would get, they asked for a “tip”
for the pro-Democratic fundraising group ActBlue.
“We’re building an army of small dollar donors to defeat
the Koch brothers and their fat checkbooks,” they said.
“Your tip of 10 percent or more will help us build the next
generation of our tools so the Kochs don’t have the final
say.”
I still said no, but at the end of all the hectoring, I hit
“contribute” to send the $5.
One might think, given the begging involved, that just a
little expression of thanks would have been in order. Instead,
I received a message saying my contribution had been
“flagged ... as requiring additional oversight.” An ActBlue
staffer would review it to “ensure that it is accurate and
meets our high safety standards.” That seemed odd, given
reports of low safety standards and alleged fraud in the
Obama campaign’s handling of small donors in 2008 and
2012.
A few minutes later, I learned my contribution had been
accepted. Then came a “priorities survey,” in which
Democrats wanted to know whether I thought the most
compelling reason to remove Republicans from power was
1) They shut down the government; 2) They gave tax breaks
to the Koch brothers; or 3) They voted to defund Planned
Parenthood. I didn’t answer.
At the very least, I thought my $5 would buy a tiny
respite from the crush of email. It did not. About an hour
later came a note from Pelosi with the subject line “Must
Read (DON’T DELETE).”
“President Obama wouldn’t have emailed you earlier if
we didn’t need your help,” Pelosi wrote, apparently trying
to suggest that Daddy would be angry with me if I didn’t
give more.
Can this continue until November? Yes, it can. But if
Democrats already sound this frantic in August, it’s going to
be a very long fall.
Byron York is chief political correspondent for The
Washington Examiner.
Dear Editor,
As I have been serving
as coalition chairperson for
Tobacco-free LeFlore
County, I have learned
some new things. For
example, what long term
smoking can do to your
body and its devastating
effects. Lung cancer, skin
cancer, mouth cancer and
many other tobacco related
diseases, not only impact
the smoker, but their family
who in some cases have to
care for the smoker who
often times quit when it’s
too late.
“Today’s teenager is
tomorrow’s potential cus-
tomer,” is a quote from
Philip Morris in 1981. Big
tobacco companies don’t
necessarily want to attract
new adult smokers. They
regard our teenagers as
replacement smokers for
those who have died from
tobacco related illnesses.
I have four grandchil-
dren who I hope can be
educated about the long
term effects of smoking
before they ever attempt to
begin this nasty and dan-
gerous addiction. I believe
that teaching children of all
ages is how we can stop
this life-altering decision.
Through this coalition I
feel that we are making a
change, even though it may
seem small at first. The
future of our children and
grandchildren depends on
it.
I urge the community to
get involved in this effort
and through us all pulling
together we can make a dif-
ference.
Glenda Wheat
Coalition Chair,
Tobacco-free LeFlore
County
Editorial excerpt from The Journal Record, Aug.
18, 2014:
Journalists, like most folks, can suffer from self-cen-
teredness. When something happens to one of us, we
think that automatically makes it news.
Last week, members of the media were covering police
actions in Ferguson, Mo., following the fatal shooting of
an unarmed man named Michael Brown. In the days and
nights that followed, professional and amateur images
showed nonviolent protesters with their hands raised,
approaching police who were in body armor. Armored
personnel carriers cleared public streets and tear gas was
fired into the residents’ yards.
Wednesday night, two journalists were detained, as
were others over the weekend as the violence ebbed and
flowed. Taking reporters into custody, in particular,
caught the news media’s eye.
Some of the public may see the reaction as journalistic
arrogance. But deeper questions lurk: What were the offi-
cers trying to hide? What did they think was going to
happen that would look bad on tape or in print?
Why does a police department in a relatively small
town have military surplus equipment, but not dashboard
video cameras that could shed light on the initial inci-
dent?
Police officers have an important and dangerous job.
Even when they operate with restraint, they know one
image can give the wrong impression. But when a line of
cops rolls down a residential street tossing flash-bang
grenades like an occupying army, the public needs to
know and the people deserve an explanation.
For nearly a week, officials refused even to name the
officer involved in the shooting.
In Oklahoma, we’re generally lucky. The police seem
to treat their fellow citizens with respect and they attempt
to create departments that reflect their communities.
But in every state, in every community, it’s important
that watchdogs have the power to keep an eye on law
enforcement officials, even in times of high tension.
Those who protect us must remember their actions are
almost always subject to public scrutiny.
Transparency, openness and honesty are the true paths
to promoting peace and security in our neighborhoods.
I’m constantly questioned
about resources available in
our area. In fact, the main
reason that Jennifer and I
started the Pervasive
Parenting Center was to help
bring resources to this area
and show what is available.
The upcoming On The Road
event will showcase many
of the resources both state-
wide and local that are avail-
able to help your family.
I have been asking Sally
Selvidge for a couple years
to please bring this event to
eastern Oklahoma, and she
finally agreed last spring.
Sooner Success sponsors
the one-day conference to
help families navigate the
disability world.
There will be more than
20 representatives on hand
to explain what their pro-
gram can do and to answer
any questions you might
have. These include TEFRA,
Oklahoma Family Network,
Partners in Policymaking,
Epilepsy Association, Easter
Seals, Oklahoma People
First, Sibshops, DDS
Waiting List, Oklahoma
Disability Law Center, and
Oklahoma Parents Center,
just to name a few.
The conference will be
held Tuesday, Sept. 16, from
8 a.m. until 3 p.m. It will be
in the Costner/Balentine
Ballroom at Carl Albert
State College in Poteau.
Lunch will be provided and
everything is free. That’s
right, it costs you nothing.
I understand that this is
being held on a weekday,
but I promise it’s worth the
time. Even if that means that
you need to take off work,
you will be glad you did.
There will be an assistive
technology demonstration at
lunch.
This is something that
can be very beneficial, and
is important for your fami-
ly.
All disabilities are includ-
ed.
You can register at:
https://soonersuccesspo-
teauotr.eventbrite.com/
Kodey Toney is a parent
of a child with autism.
E-mail him with questions
or ideas at pervasiveparent-
ing@hotmail.com. You also
can find all columns archived
at blogspot.com.
Pervasive Parenting
Kodey Toney
PAGE 4 . . . WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014
Opinions
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
On the road again
True paths to peace
Editorial Roundup
MEMBER:
“LeFlore County’s Newspaper Since 1895”
The Poteau Daily News (USPS 440-200) is published daily by
Horizon Oklahoma Publishing Company Inc., Poteau, OK 74953.
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SERVING LEFLORE COUNTY
2013
BETTER
NEWSPAPER CONTEST
AWARD WINNER
Presented by the
OKLAHOMA PRESS
ASSOCIATION
Gloomy, frantic Dems plead for more money
Letter
to the
EDITOR
Guest Column
Byron York
POTEAU DAILY NEWS Agriculture WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014 . . . PAGE 5
DO YOU NEED
MONEY FOR
SCHOOL????
DO YOU HAVE A DISABILITY??
LOOKING FOR A JOB???
ARE YOU IN COLLEGE???
THE CHOCTAW NATION VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION MAY BE ABLE TO ASSIT YOU!!!
ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:
1. Must have a physical or mental impairment which constitutes or results in a substantial
impediment to employment
2. Live within our 10 ½ counties
3. Must be member of ANY federally recognized tribe
For more information on how to apply please call 580-326-8304 or 1-877-285-6893
DO YOU NEED MONEY
FOR SCHOOL????
DO YOU HAVE A DISABILITY???
LOOKING FOR A JOB???
ARE YOU IN COLLEGE???
THE CHOCTAW NATION VOCATIONAL
REHABILITATION MAY BE ABLE
TO ASSIST YOU!!!
ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:
1. Must have a physical or mental impairment
which constitutes or results in a substantial
impediment to employment
2. Live within our 10-1/2 counties
3. Must be a member of ANY federally
recognized tribe
For more information on how to apply
please call 580-326-8304 or 1-877-285-6893.
LEFLORE COUNTY
707 Highland Ave. • Wister • 918-655-7462
SALE EVERY SATURDAY
Thanks for
your
continued
support!
See you
at the
Sale on
Saturday!
10 a.m. – HOG and GOAT SALE
Followed by HORSE SALE
12 noon – CATTLE SALE
Fruits and vegetables are offered at the farmers market set up outside of Choctaw Nation Community
Center in Durant.
Photo by Zach Maxwell
Tribe marks Farmers Market Week
By Zach Maxwell
Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma
DURANT — The Choctaw
Nation Nutrition Program celebrated
National Farmers Market Week
Aug. 3-9. Choctaw Nation supports
local farmers markets in several
locations in its service area.
Local growers typically bring
their produce on Wednesdays at 9
a.m. to Choctaw Nation Community
Centers or senior buildings in
Durant, Atoka, Hugo, McAlester,
Stigler, Broken Bow and Idabel.
The farmer’s markets are open from
9 a.m. until noon unless produce
sells out.
The tribe also provides support
for markets in Talihina, Wister and
Poteau.
Items found at the markets
include tomatoes, cabbage and
varieties of squash, garlic, onions,
blackberries, potatoes and more.
The menu will change with the
seasons. The markets are supported
by the Choctaw Nation Farmers
Market Nutrition Program.
Choctaw elders are reminded that
applications are available for
produce vouchers at local community
centers.
WASHINGTON (AP)
— Faced with tougher and
more resistant weeds, corn
and soybean farmers are
anxiously awaiting govern-
ment decisions on a new
version of a popular herbi-
cide — and on genetically
modified seeds to grow
crops designed to resist it.
Critics say more study is
needed on the effects of the
herbicide and they are con-
cerned it could endanger
public health.
The Environmental Pro-
tection Agency is expected
to rule this fall on Dow
AgroSciences’ application
to market Enlist, a new ver-
sion of the 2,4-D herbicide
that’s been around since the
1940s. It’s partly a game of
catch-up for the agriculture
industry, as many farmers
are dealing with weeds that
have become resistant to
glyphosate, an herbicide
commonly used on corn
and soybeans now.
If approved, the 2,4-D
would be used in combina-
tion with glyphosate.
An Agriculture Depart-
ment decision on the com-
pany’s genetically modified
seeds also is expected this
fall. In the department’s
final environmental review
released last week, the
USDA recommended
approval. The agency said
that if both the seeds and
herbicide are approved, the
use of 2,4-D could increase
by an estimated 200 to 600
percent by the year 2020.
While the USDA only
oversees the safety of the
plants, the EPA oversees
the safety of the herbicide
for human and environ-
mental health. The agency
has already found the
chemical safe several times
for other species as well as
for the public and agricul-
tural workers.
Groups lobbying the
agency to prevent the her-
bicide’s expanded use say
they are concerned about
the toxic effects of the her-
bicide and the potential for
it to drift. Corn and soy-
beans are the nation’s larg-
est crops, and the potential
for expanded use is huge.
Scott Faber of the Envi-
ronmental Working Group
said the EPA studies so far
have not been comprehen-
sive enough and need to
look more closely into the
effects of pesticides on
children.
“This is a once-in-a-gen-
eration decision that will
have a huge impact on pub-
lic health, especially on
farmers and rural resi-
dents,” Faber said.
“This is a moment to
step back and ask if this is a
durable weed control solu-
tion for farmers.”
Ruling could
boost popular
weed killer
Coveys and cattle
Quail symposium slated
Quail have been few and far between
throughout the past few years. However,
an upcoming event has been scheduled for
land managers and quail hunters interested
in having more of the birds on their prop-
erty
Oklahoma State University has part-
nered with the Oklahoma Department of
Wildlife Conservation and Quail Forever
to host the Oklahoma Quail Symposium
Saturday. The daylong event will begin
with registration at 9:30 a.m. and will con-
tinue at the Crowne Plaza hotel by North-
west Expressway and May Avenue in
Oklahoma City.
“The symposium will cover topics such
as quail habitat management, cost share
opportunities for landowners, an update on
the latest research in Oklahoma and infor-
mation about quail management activities
on wildlife management areas,” said
Dwayne Elmore, OSU Cooperative Exten-
sion wildlife specialist.
Elmore will give a presentation titled
“Coveys and Cattle: Using Land to Pro-
duce Both Beef and Bobwhites.” Other
OSU experts and specialists from ODWC,
the National Resource Conversation Ser-
vice, Quail Forever and Texas Parks and
Wildlife Department also will lead discus-
sions during the symposium.
Cost to attend the event is $20, which
includes lunch. Following the symposium
will be the Quail Forever ninth annual
fundraising banquet at 5:30 p.m.
The banquet dinner will feature prizes,
auctions and entertainment. Tickets for the
banquet are $60, which includes member-
ship to Quail Forever. A special prize of
$70 is offered to those quail enthusiasts
who choose to attend both the symposium
and the banquet dinner.
To register for either event, call (405)
415-5724, email info@centralokquailfor-
ever.org or visit the website at central-
okquailforever.org.
The LeFlore County
Free Fair will be held Sept.
5-6 at the fairgrounds in
Poteau. Exhibit entries are
due Wednesday, Sept. 3.
Home-baked goods are
needed for the 4-H conces-
sion stand, according to
Danette Russell.
Volunteers are needed to
check in the open exhibits.
If you are available to
help, contact Russell at the
OSU Extension office,
(918) 647-8231.
County fair exhibit deadline nears
Soon, parking lots of col-
leges, high schools and pro-
fessional stadiums across
the nation will be filled with
fans gearing up for another
sporting season — and the
tailgating celebrations that
go hand-in-hand.
Die-hard tailgaters have
come to revel in the culinary
pride of putting together the
best and most creative bar-
becue and tailgate grub.
While traditional menus fea-
ture staples such as ham-
burgers, hot dogs, baked
beans and cold salads, tail-
gate “chefs” are now only
limited by their imagina-
tions.
However, traditional tail-
gating fare hasn’t been high
on the nutrition scale, and
this pre-game celebrating is
a classic example of food-
centric entertainment in
which people unintentional-
ly become less conscious of
the calories they consume.
Score big with better-
for-you options
Approaching your tail-
gating food shopping and
preparation with slight
changes can make a big
nutritional impact, allowing
you to enjoy both the game
and the good food that goes
with it.
One tool to simplify your
tailgating prep is the NuVal(r)
Nutritional Scoring System.
Many grocery retailers are
now providing scores (on a
scale of 1 to 100) on the
price tag to help guide shop-
pers of all ages toward more
nutritious food choices —
the higher the score, the
higher the nutritional quality
of the food or beverage.
“Contrary to what many
people think, celebrating
before the big game doesn’t
have to mean ditching sen-
sible eating. Food can be
fun, flavorful and better for
you — even the snacks,”
said Marisa Paolillo, a NuVal
nutritionist. “It begins with
smarter choices at the gro-
cery store, and simple swaps
for some of your favorite
foods. But keep in mind,
offering more nutritious
food does not mean you can
eat endless quantities.”
Tips for your tailgate
menu
The rules of thumb on
better-for-you tailgate side
dishes are that baked is
always better than deep-
fried, and homemade recipes
allow you to control the
ingredients. Paolillo offers
these tips to help consumers
pick tailgate foods that not
only fill up hungry sports
fans, but also add nutrition
to the fun:
• Choose lean grilling
options such as skinless
chicken breast (NuVal 57) or
hamburgers made with 95
percent lean ground beef
(NuVal 57). Skip calorie-
rich condiments and boost
the flavor of your burger
with toppings which earn
high NuVal scores like:
NuVal 100 — mushrooms,
grilled onions, fresh pineap-
ple, jalapenos and roasted
red peppers; or NuVal 88 —
avocado.
• Ditch pre-packaged
marinades for endless home-
made and fresh options.
Combine herbs such as basil,
rosemary or dill with citrus
fruits, spices, onion and gar-
lic with a little olive oil.
• Grilled corn on the cob
is the perfect grill buddy,
and it’s easy. With a NuVal
Score of 100, fresh corn on
the cob can be cooked on the
grill either wrapped in its
own husks (more dramatic)
or in aluminum foil. Add
flavor with herbs and spices
before roasting.
• Use whole wheat pasta
for macaroni salad, and add
plenty of veggies and a meat
or bean as a protein source
to boost the nutritional value.
Replace heavy pre-packaged
creamy dressings, which
often contain hidden sugar
and sodium, with homemade
vinaigrettes to control the
ingredients.
• Black beans and corn,
with NuVal 100 scores, add
nutrients and a Southwest
flair to guacamole and salsa,
and they’re great for dipping
tortilla chips and bite-sized
vegetables.
• Shrimp or chicken
skewers, with NuVal scores
averaging 57, are a great
protein alternative to tradi-
tional hamburgers and hot-
dogs, especially when pre-
pared with chunks of onions,
peppers, tomatoes, mush-
rooms, zucchini, squash and
sweet peppers (all scoring
NuVal 100).
• Add water to the cooler
to keep tailgaters hydrated.
Fresh lemon and lime add a
citrus flair.
Need more tips? Find a
participating store near you
at nuval.com/location.
For those who wish to make updates to their home,
the kitchen is a great place to begin. According to the
2013 Cost vs. Value report from Remodeling magazine,
a minor kitchen remodel should recoup up to 75 percent
of total remodeling dollars, based on the value of the
home increasing. When focusing on this important part
of the house, many homeowners are looking for ways to
add luxurious and modern touches without breaking the
bank.
“Whether you want to splurge on cabinets, counter-
tops, appliances or floors, homeowners are finding they
really can have the kitchen they’ve always wanted by
doing their research and learning about the many high-
quality, yet cost-effective alternatives that exist in home
remodeling,” said Trisha Schmitt, vice president of VT
Industries.
Getting more out of your remodeling dollars
From small fixes to bigger projects, the experts at VT
Industries provide these ideas to make kitchen updates
without emptying your pocketbook.
• Countertops: Serving as an integral piece of your
kitchen space, the addition of new countertops can eas-
ily become the priciest part of the remodel project. Hom-
eowners like the look of granite and real stone, but want a
durable and affordable alternative that helps them achieve
the look they desire with the budget they have. A new
alternative for countertops is the Capture Collection from
VT Dimensions. This affordable design element mimics
the beauty and strength of stone materials at a fraction of
the cost.
• Backsplash: To add a sleek and modern touch to your
kitchen space, consider adding a new backsplash. Typi-
cally made from ceramic, glass or stainless steel tile, a
backsplash is an affordable option for
those who want to add an understated
change or a small pop of color as an ac-
cent. When compared to other remodel-
ing projects this one is quick and easy.
• Hardware: Did you know you can
refresh the look of your whole kitchen
for as little as $50? If the hardware on
your kitchen drawers or cabinets has an
outdated appearance, invest in some of
the new options available at your local
hardware store. Change out old, brushed
stainless or gold knobs and pulls with the
newer, on-trend styles offered in pewter
or bronze.
• Porcelain tile flooring: If you want the
look of stone flooring without the hefty
cost, check out the many offerings of por-
celain tile. This sturdy, chip-resistant sur-
face is easy on the wallet and can provide
long-lasting beauty to your kitchen floors
for many years.
To get the most from your remodel-
ing dollars, homeowners are encouraged
to do some digging and find out the best
deals and alternatives available. For more
tips for updating your home, visit www.
vtdimensions.com.
Add appeal, save on your remodeling project
Tips to make the most of your budget
PAGE 6 . . . WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014
Lifestyles
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
2100 S. Broadway, Poteau • 918-647-2228
Go Further
ATTN: WISTER SCHOOL PATRONS
We will be discussing details and answering
questions regarding the upcoming bond issue. We
encourage you to attend this meeting, with any
questions or concerns. School administrators will
be available to show the serious facility issues
that must soon be addressed.
If you cannot attend and have questions,
please call Superintendent Jerry Carpenter at
918-658-8234 or call Wister School:
918-655-3132
201 Logan St.
Wister, OK 74966
www.wister.k12.ok.us
P UB L I C F OR UM
WISTER SCHOOL CAFETORIUM
THURSDAY, AUG. 21 @ 6:30 P.M.
ELECTION: AUG. 26, 2014
GO WILDCATS!!!
Tailgate tips that add flavor, nutrition
MINNEAPOLIS (AP)
— Erik Kratz had played in
only fve games for Kansas
City since being acquired
from Toronto in a trade on
July 28.
But the big guy always
stayed ready and that disci-
pline paid off Monday night
to keep the Royals rolling.
Kratz homered twice
after replacing an ailing
Salvador Perez, and Jason
Vargas pitched seven strong
innings to lead the frst-place
Royals to a 6-4 victory over
the Minnesota Twins.
“You put your work in
before the game as a bench
guy to be ready to go in,”
Kratz said. “Some people
could say well, Salvi plays
every day, so why not take
a day off? In my opinion,
what’s the point of taking a
day off if that might be the
day you come in and play?”
Vargas (10-5) allowed
one run on four this and
struck out three, but had
his scoreless innings streak
snapped at 17 when Oswal-
do Arcia hit a solo homer in
the seventh. Perez had two
hits and two RBIs before
leaving in the seventh be-
cause of discomfort in his
right knee, helping the Roy-
als win for the 21st time in
26 games.
Kansas City extended its
lead over the idle Detroit
Tigers in the AL Central to
two games.
Trevor May (0-2) gave
up three runs on seven hits
and walked four in 4.2 in-
nings for the Twins.
When Perez left, Kratz
came in as a pinch hitter
and broke his bat on a pitch
from Anthony Swarzak, but
still managed to muscle it
over the wall in left feld
for a 4-0 lead. Kratz added
a solo shot to center in the
ninth for his frst multi-
homer game.
The drives proved even
more important when Trev-
or Plouffe hit a three-run
homer off Aaron Crow in
the ninth inning.
“It’s great to help the
team out when you do get
in there for any bench guy,”
Kratz said.
Greg Holland came on
for his 38th save in 40 tries.
Josh Willingham had three
hits and Alex Gordon and
Billy Butler each had two
for the Royals, who have
won eight straight series for
the frst time since 1991.
May made his major
league debut on Aug. 9,
and it was a rough one. He
walked seven batters in two
innings and gave up four
runs. He breezed through
four innings of his home
debut, but walked the bases
loaded in the ffth.
Perez followed with a
two-run single and Butler
added an RBI single to give
the Royals a 3-0 lead.
That was enough for
Vargas, who has dominated
the Twins this season. He
retired 10 in a row from the
second through sixth while
his offense built him a cush-
ion.
“Salvi’s a huge part of our
team, but we have to keep
him healthy and keep him in
it for the long haul,” Vargas
said. “For Kratz to come in
and step up and go big fy
twice was pretty nice, espe-
cially when they were able
to extend the game a little
bit there. Those two home
runs really counted.”
INDIANOLA — The
Lefore Lady Savages split
their road games in Mon-
day’s three-way at Indianola,
beating the host team 17-7
but losing to Savanna 8-2.
In the win over Indianola,
Emily Sinclair went 3-for-
3 with three runs batted in,
Kaylee Roath went 2-for-3
with four RBIs and Camri
Duncan went 2-for-3 with
three RBIs for Lefore. Roath
got the win.
In the loss to Savanna,
Roath went 1-for-2, while
Ayme Warren went 1-for-
2 with an RBI for the Lady
Savages (5-1). Roath (5-1)
took the loss.
Spiro 14, McAlester 0,
4 inn.: In McAlester, Spiro
pitcher Hannah Gilliam (3-2)
pitched a four-hitter, and her
Lady Bulldogs (3-2) were
the recipients of nine McAl-
ester errors.
The Lady Bulldogs scored
twice in the opening inning,
then added three in the sec-
ond, fve in the third and four
in the fourth to put the game
into run-rule status.
For the game, Bailey Cox
was 3-for-4 with three runs
batted in and two runs scored,
Megan Shaw was 2-for-4
with two runs scored and an
RBI, Sierra Perdue was 2-for-
3 with a double and three
runs scored and Gilliam was
2-for-4 with three RBIs.
Whitesboro 15, Hai-
leyville 0, 4 inn.: In Hai-
leyville, the Lady Bulldogs
(2-2), leading 1-0 after an
inning, erupted for a pair of
fve-run innings in the sec-
ond and third frames for an
11-0 lead. A four-run fourth
inning put the game into run-
rule status.
For the game, Lexey
Branscum was 2-for-3 with
four runs batted in and four
runs scored, Abigail Phillips
was 2-for-2 with two RBIs
and Lauren Harper had two
RBIs.
Branscum (2-1) got the
win, pitching two innings
with four strikeouts. Shania
McKosky pitched the fnal
two innings with two strike-
outs.
Games Rained Out
Several games were rained
out due to Monday late after-
noon storms. Games washed
were Talihina at Poteau,
Cameron at Wister, Howe
and McCurtain at Heavener,
Keota at Panama and Quin-
ton at Pocola. No make-up
dates for these games have
been scheduled.
Also, Tuesday’s Pocola
road game at Wilburton was
canceled and has not been re-
scheduled.
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
Sports
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014 . . . PAGE 7
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This 21st century innovation is the marriage of Energy Medicine technology com-
bined with proven traditional Chinese acupuncture to activate the body’s meridians,
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Sleep disorders affect millions of people. According to the National Sleep Founda-
tion’s national survey, 54 percent of adults said they have experienced at least one
symptom of insomnia. Sleep if vital to good health and according to the CDC it ranks
right up there with healthy eating and exercise. Poor sleep can lead to depression,
health problems — even accidents.
President of Miracle Balance Lester Ford notes, “I could not be more excited. This
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(918) 647-3555
Tickets still remain for
the Poteau Pirates’ football
season opener in the
Hooten’s Kickoff Classic
against Alma, Ark., at Fort
Smith [Ark.] Northside
High School at 5:30 p.m.
Sept. 4.
Tickets for adults and
students cost $7 per person,
while pre-schoolers will be
admitted for free.
For those wishing to pur-
chase tickets, call Poteau
coach Greg Werner at (918)
839-4572 or come by the
high school or football
fieldhouse.
• • •
Registration for the fall
season for the LeFlore
County Youth Soccer
Association will end today.
For those who signed up
to be coaches, there will be
a coaches meeting next
Friday at the Patrick Lynch
Public Library.
Practices will begin Aug.
25 with the first games of
league play beginning Sept.
6.
• • •
The 2014 Poteau Fall
Softball League and 2014
Poteau Fall Baseball League
are ready to register teams
for the upcoming season.
In softball the age groups
will be ages 12-, 10- and
8-and-younger. The entry
fee for the 12-and-younger
division is $300 per team,
while the entry fee for the
other two divisions is $250
per team.
In baseball the age group
will be peewees and midget
divisions. The entry fee is
$300 per team.
Each league will have a
12-game schedule.
For additional informa-
tion, call Billy Bond at
(918) 647-1939.
• • •
There will be a fall
coach-pitch baseball league
at Heavener's Blues Park
that will play games on
Sundays during September.
For additional informa-
tion, call Bobby Pickle at
(918) 721-3492.
• • •
The 32nd annual Carl
Albert State College
Coaches Golf Classic will
begin at 10 a.m. Sept. 12 at
Wolf Ridge Country Club.
Registration will begin at 9
a.m. Sept. 12.
The entry fee is $50 per
player, which includes
green fees and golf carts as
well as one mulligan per
side per person.
To register or for addi-
tional information, call the
CASC Office for Student
Affairs at (918) 647-1376.
• • •
There will be two soft-
ball tournaments taking
place this fall at the Poteau
Area Recreational Complex,
one Sept. 13 and the other
on Oct. 6.
Each tournament will
feature three age divisions
of teams — ages 14-, 12-
and 10-and-younger — and
will all follow USSSA
rules.
Each tournament will
have a four-game guaran-
tee.
For additional informa-
tion, call Dale Lowrimore
at (918) 839-7771 or go
online to www.usssa.com.
• • •
The Howe Lady Lions
basketball team is going to
have a pair of alumni bas-
ketball games tentatively
scheduled for Oct. 25 at the
Howe Gym. The game
times will be determined
later, but the games will
likely be afternoon and/or
night contests.
One game will be for
those past players who
played during the 6-on-6
era, while the second game
will be the more modern
5-on-5 style. Each game
will be alumni vs. alumni.
The cost will be $10 per
player. All proceeds will
benefit the Lady Lions' bas-
ketball program For addi-
tional information, call
Chris Brown at (918) 658-
8256 or go to the Howe
Lady Lions Basketball Page
on Facebook.
• • •
The Poteau Youth
Wrestling Club is having a
drawing for a Ruger 243
rifle on Nov. 8. Tickets cost
$5 each or a block of five
for $20.
All proceeds will help
fund the organization’s
attempt to bring Mike
Krause to town for a wres-
tling camp, but a total of at
least 600 tickets must be
purchased in order to make
it possible for Krause to
come.
For additional informa-
tion, go to the oranization’s
Facebook page.
Sports Briefs
Subject to terms, conditions and availability. Allstate Fire and Casualty Insurance Co. ©2013 Allstate Insurance Co.
POTEAU
lylewhitworth@allstate.com
Call or stop by to see how much you can save.
LYLE WHITWORTH
918-647-4443
Let me help protect you before mayhem strikes.
From a tree branch falling on your car during a
windstorm to a GPS that sends you the wrong
way down a one-way, mayhem can strike
anytime. So get an Allstate Agent like me
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9
3
0
4
4
Citizens of LeFlore County
Upon retiring as your LeFlore County
Assessor, I would like to thank each and
every one of you for your confidence and
support in allowing me the opportunity to
serve as your county assessor.
As you all know, experience and common
sense are a great combination and Brenda
Cockburn has just that. She has 21 years
of experience in the LeFlore County As-
sessor’s office and is always willing to
help in any way she can. Brenda is fully
qualified and I would highly recommend
her to serve as your next LeFlore County
Assessor.
Thanks Again,
Tim Trent
Paid for by Tim Trent
Leflore girls split road three-way,
beat Indianola but fall to Savanna
Monday’s High School Softball Roundup
Car di nal s
beat Reds in
10 innings
ST. LOUIS (AP) — Walk-
ing Billy Hamilton to start the
ninth inning was a bad sign
for Trevor Rosenthal. For the
second straight game, the St.
Louis Cardinals picked up
their young closer.
“We’re digging our heels
in,” Cardinals manager Mike
Matheny said after Jhonny
Peralta singled in the winning
run in the 10th for a 6-5 vic-
tory over the Cincinnati Reds
on Monday night. “That’s
what I love about this club.”
Jay Bruce homered, dou-
bled and knocked in four runs
for the Reds, giving him nine
RBIs in four games. Bran-
don Phillips returned from
left thumb surgery wearing a
brace and was 0 for 4 with a
walk.
The Reds have dropped
seven of nine and are 18-30
in one-run games.
Peralta had three hits, and
his RBI single in the frst was
just his second in 32 at-bats
against the Reds this season.
Red Oak boys too much for Whitesboro
RED OAK — Fresh off winning its own
Red Oak Eagle Classic, the Red Oak Eagles
picked up right where they left off this past
weekend as they took care of the Whitesboro
Bulldogs 15-0 in four innings on Monday.
The Bulldogs (0-4) had only a hit by Aus-
tin Stepp to show for their offensive efforts.
Sawyer Adams (0-2) took the loss.
Editor’s note: Nothing was reported on
Cameron’s doubleheader at McCurtain by
press time. Look for the details in Thursday’s
edition. Monday afternoon’s Howe-Wister
doubleheader was rained out and has not
been rescheduled.
Kratz, Vargas lead Royals over Twins
PAGE 8 . . . WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014 Sports POTEAU DAILY NEWS
The Poteau Daily News is your
best source for local sports
coverage in LeFlore County
HAVING A [STICK] BALL — Members of the
Choctaw Nation Youth stickball team had their first
practices last week. Members consist of area students
ages 8 to 17. Practices will be at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at
the Choctaw Community Center in Poteau. The team
had its first practice Tuesday. Youth stickball is spon-
sored by Choctaw Nation, Poteau Johnson O'Malley,
and councilman Delton Cox. For more information,
call at (918) 647-9324.
Photo by Dewayne Hornbuckle
Arkoma football team in road scrimmage
Friday night against Wright Christian
By David Seeley
PDN Sports Editor
The Arkoma Mustangs, fresh off
their historic 2013 season in which
they won the schools frst playoff
game and made the Class C state quar-
terfnals, will begin their new season
as a Class B school in Friday night's
road scrimmage against Wright Chris-
tian in Tulsa. Action will begin at 6
p.m.
Due to youth, Arkoma coach Mark
Weatherton is anxious to see what his
players will do come game time.
“We don't have a senior on the team
right now,” he said. “Right now, we're
probably going to be starting four
sophomores, two freshmen and two
juniors on offense. We're going to be
pretty young. It's probably going to
be the same way on defense. We may
start three juniors on defense. What-
ever happens on Friday night, it's go-
ing to be a great experience for them,
to see what they do when the lights are
turned on. We'll see what happens.”
There are two main things Weath-
erton wants to see Friday night.
“We don't have all of our offense
schemes in, but the ones that we do
have I want us to go out and execute
them, and not have a mental break-
down or a missed blocking assign-
ment,” he said. “Defensively, I want
to see some playmakers, especially at
linebacker and defensive end. Those
are the two main things. Offensive
execution and someone step up and
make tackles.”
Practices have been going well for
the Mustangs.
“I've been very happy with the
numbers we have out,” Weatherton
said. “I'm real happy with their efforts
and how they're paying attention to
the things that we're throwing at them.
They're really soaking it up.”
Spiro to be in five-way football
scrimmage Thursday night at
Okmulgee with Tulsa Hale,
Tulsa McLain, Tulsa Webster
By David Seeley
PDN Sports Editor
As practice started,
Spiro football coach Chris
Bunch was very con-
cerned with his linemen,
on both sides of the ball.
He hopes to get some
answers Thursday night
when his Bulldogs will be
in a fve-way scrimmage
at Okmulgee with three
Tulsa schools — Tulsa
Hale, Tulsa McLain/TSST
and Tulsa Webster.
The junior varsity por-
tion of the scrimmage will
begin at 5 p.m., followed
by the varsity squads at 6
p.m.
“On offense, we're
mainly going to look at
our offensive line,” Bunch
said.
“On defense, we're go-
ing to look at our defen-
sive line and linebackers.
Those are our big question
marks right now.”
Bunch wishes the scrim-
mage part of the preseason
would have been pushed
back another week.
“We're ready to get
started, but the bad thing
is it's awful early,” he said.
“With only one week of
practice, it's hard to say
what's going to happen.”
Other than Monday's
wash out due to the mid af-
ternoon storms that rolled
through the area, practices
have gone pretty well for
the ’Dogs.
“Overall, practrice has
been good,” Bunch said.
“[Monday] was a wash-
out and that put us a day
behind, but overall, we're
happy.”
Panama ready for first scrimmage Friday
night; Hogs facing host Savanna, Atoka
By David Seeley
PDN Sports Editor
Panama football coach Brandon Ellis is anxious to see
just where his team is at after two weeks of practice. He'll get
some answers Friday night when his Razorbacks will be in
a road three-way scrimmage at 6 p.m. against host Savanna
and Atoka.
“We're going to see how far we've come on running the
plays we've set in,” Ellis said. “We want to see how condi-
tioned we are. We need to see if we can sustain drives with-
out turning the ball over.”
Fans going will not see much of the Hogs' arsenal in Fri-
day night's three-way scrimmage, just the basics.
“We're not going to be seeing these guys, but I don't want
to give too much information to Gore, who we play in Week
1,” Ellis said. “We're going to keep it pretty basic.”
Ellis has been pleased with how practices have gone so
far.
“The practices have been really good,” he said. “We're
wrapping up our two-a-days [Tuesday]. We've gotten a lot
of reps in and gotten a lot of conditioning in. We've gotten to
work a lot with the kids on offense and defense. We're mak-
ing strides. We're not where we need to be to be ready for our
frst game, but we're getting a lot of reps in. Our conditioning
will be a big factor for us when we play Gore.”
OKLAHOMA CITY
(AP) — The Oklahoma City
Thunder will play a seven
game preseason NBA sched-
ule that includes games in
Tulsa and in Wichita, Kan-
sas.
The Thunder announced
Monday that the team will
open preseason play on the
road with games Oct. 8 at
Denver and Oc.t 10 at Dal-
las. Memphis will then come
to Oklahoma City for a game
on Oct. 14 followed by the
Thunder playing at New Or-
leans on Oct. 16.
Oklahoma City will then
take on Toronto in Wichita
on Oct. 17 and will play
Minnesota in Tulsa on Oct.
19 before wrapping up ex-
hibition play against Utah in
Oklahoma City.
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
Sports
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014 . . . PAGE 9
The
Poteau
Daily News
is your
best
source for
local
sports
coverage
in LeFlore
County
Pic Credit: Kimberly Porter,
KP Expressions Photography,
www.kpexpressionsphotography.com
Honor and thank our military,
firefighters, law enforcement
officers and emergency personnel.
Submit your photos to
editor@poteaudailynews.com,
along with name, branch of
service, department and any
other relevant information you
would like to see published.
Advertising Deadline:
Aug. 30
Publishes in the
Poteau Daily News:
Sept. 6
Football Season
is Coming....
Watch for Our
Gridiron Preview
Coming August 30th.
Advertisers don’t miss this opportunity
to show support for your favorite
football team.
Call Lisa or Theresa at 918-647-3188
and advertise today!
SERVING LEFLORE COUNTY
BACK-TO-BACK CHECKERED FLAGS — Pocola’s Michael Brasch, front cen-
ter with child holding trophy, won his second straight factory stock race during
Saturday night’s races at Tri-State Speedway near Pocola.
Photo by Mary Gray/Flag to Flag Photos and Videos
Tri-State Speedway Results,
Updated Point Standings
Saturday at Pocola
Editor’s note: All race results and point
standings will have the top three plus any
other local racer.
Pure Stock Race
1. Marshall Penson, Van Buren, Ark.; 2.
Tyler Chambers, Welling; 3. Zane Hunter,
Alma; 8. Junior Thornburg, Spiro.
Factory Stock Race
1. Michael Brasch, Pocola; 2. Darren
Scott, Springdale, Ark.; 3. Devon Johnson,
N/A.
Super Stock Race
1. Kyle Slader, Muskogee; 2. Gean
Davlin, Shady Point; 3. Freddie Hogrefe,
N/A; 4. Dylan Davlin, Shady Point; 8.
Ron Grover, Pocola; 9. Chris Nicholson,
Pocola; 14. Dakota Essman, Spiro.
USRA A Modifed Race
1. Randy Henson, Alma; 2. Brent Hol-
man, Rogers, Ark.; 3. Jeremy Rasmussen,
Rogers; 5. Martin Hemphill, Spiro; 12.
Allen Owen, Pocola; 13. Jeremy Vaughn,
Pocola.
USRA B Modifed Race
1. Lonny Flanagan, Rudy, Ark.; 2. Greg
Woodcock, Neosho, Mo.; 3. Camden Perry,
Lincoln, Ark.
Economy/360 Modifed Race
1. Zane Hunter, Alma; 2. Dalton McK-
enzie, Van Buren; 3. Anthony Reeves, Mul-
berry, Ark.
Front Wheel Drive Race
1. James Poe, Gravette, Ark.; 2. Brian
White, Mountainburg, Ark.; 3. Chris Per-
kins, Rudy; 5. Joshua Jones, Spiro; 6.
Tom Paulson, Spiro.
Mini Stock Race
1. Christopher Tuck, Mulberry; 2. Tony
Ferrari, Alma; 3. Charles Jones, Van Bu-
ren.
Enduro Series Race No. 2
1. Jeremy Wilson, Humboldt, Kan.; 2.
Greg Dobbs, Booneville, Ark.; 3. Chris Per-
kins, Rudy.
Point Standings
Pure Stock Division
1. Marshall Penson, Van Buren, 1,505
points; 2. Fred Ross, Eufaula, 1,087; 3. Zane
Hunter, Alma, 841; 10. Junior Thornburg,
Spiro, 391; 22. Junior Grim, Pocola, 150.
Factory Stock Division
1. Jerome Heinrich, Huntsville, Ark.,
1,627 points; 2. Kyle McAllister, Fort
Smith, Ark., 1,495; 3. Darren Scott, Spring-
dale, 1,287; 6. Michael Brasch, Pocola,
849; 8. Wendell Vaughn, Pocola, 587; 19.
James Johnson, Arkoma, 312; 20. Travis
Vaughn, Pocola, 271; 24. Jerrod Adams,
Wister, 142; 25. Joshua Vaughn, Pocola,
136; 32. Caleb Speers, Talihina, 66.
Super Stock Division
1. Dylan Davlin, Shady Point, 1,465
points; 2. Neil Johnston, Fort Smith, 1,338;
3. Ron Grover, Pocola, 1,274; 7. Gean
Davlin, Shady Point, 709; T14. Jeffrey
Fountain, Spiro, 302; 21. Robert Knowles,
Buffalo Valley, 253; 28. Chris Nicholson,
Pocola, 152; T38. Brandon Lovell, Boko-
she, 72; 44. Dakota Essman, Spiro, 64.
USRA A Modifed Division
1. Brian Williams, Fayetteville, Ark.,
1,683 points; 2. George Martin, Fort Smith,
1,616; 3. Randy Henson, Alma, 1,585; 5.
Jeremy Vaughn, Pocola, 1,177; 11. Mar-
tin Hemphill, Spiro, 622; 23. Darwin
Hale, Spiro, 233; 32. Allen Owen, Pocola,
140; 33. Jerry Standifer, Howe, 138; T61.
Martin Dunigan, Poteau, 45.
USRA B Modifed Division
1. Chris Hawkins, Neosho, 1,555 points;
2. Todd Broyles, Farmington, Ark., 1,374;
3. Camden Perry, Lincoln, 979; 5. Jeremy
Smith, Spiro, 798.
Economy/360 Modifed Division
1. Zane Hunter, Alma, 838 points; 2. Del-
man Burris, N/A, 802; 3. Anthony Reeves,
Mulberry, 664; T12. Dakota Essman,
Spiro, 84.
Front Wheel Drive Division
1. Chris Perkins, Rudy, 840 points; 2.
James Poe, Gravette, 777; 3. Scott Bridges,
Rogers, 588; 4. Joshua Jones, Spiro, 448;
13. Tom Paulson, Spiro, 162; 14. Chel-
sie Jones, Spiro, 156; T23. Jerry Jones,
Spiro, 76.
Mini Stock Division
1. Christopher Tuck, Mulberry, 484
points; 2. Tony Ferrari, Alma, 469; 3. Charles
Jones, Van Buren.
Up Next: The sixth annual Tillman Evans
Memorial Point Races and Robert’s Pull-A-
Part $1,000-to-Win Enduro Races No. 2.
OKC Thunder announce seven-game
preseason schedule for ’14-’15 season
Pocola Indians face Gore in road
football scrimmage Friday night
By David Seeley
PDN Sports Editor
The Pocola Indians will see what kinds
of strides they’ve made in the early stages of
football practice when they will be in their
frst scrimmage at 6:30 p.m. Friday on the
road against the Gore Pirates.
“I want to see how the kids react to adver-
sity,” Pocola coach Rick Lang. “We’re look-
ing to see of the kids can handle it. I want
them to come out and get after it. I want them
to compete for positions. I want them to com-
pete like their job is on the line with every
snap. I want to see some enthusiasm. It’s go-
ing to be a challenge for us since this is our
frst scrimmage.”
The Indians have been using the early
practice sessions to get things ironed out for
the regular season, which will begin Sept. 5 at
Sallisaw-Central.
“We’re still working on getting kids into
the right spots,” Lang said. “I’m kind of
wanting to see how our kids on the offensive
line perform. I think with our skill kids we
have, they’ll take care of themselves. I’m go-
ing to challenge those offensive linemen be-
cause they’re going to have to grow up in a
hurry. Defensively, I want to see how well we
tackle. I want to see great open-feld tacklers.
I think we’re a good gang-tackling team, but
I want to see how well we tackle in the open
feld.”
Lang likes how practices have gone and
where his team is at in this stage of the pre-
season.
“I like where we’re at,” he said. “We’re try-
ing to fnd back-ups for our quarterback, for
example. We’re trying to move kids around.
We’re also trying to get our kids to step up.
The kids are getting into shape every day.
We’re in better shape now than we were at
this time last week. We’re pushing hard, and
our conditioning is better. We haven’t done a
whole lot of hitting yet, but I know we’ll hit
when it comes time.”
Dallas Cowboys facing uncertainty with
shaky defense after first two preseason
games against San Diego, Baltimore
IRVING, Texas (AP) —
Brandon Carr should make
his preseason debut Saturday
night in Miami after missing
the frst two weeks of train-
ing camp to be with his ail-
ing mother before she died of
breast cancer.
Fellow Dallas cornerback
Morris Claiborne’s outlook
is less certain because of a
shoulder problem, and new-
comers Henry Melton and
Terrell McClain are unlikely
to play at defensive tackle
because of injuries.
The Dallas defense was
signifcantly better against
Baltimore after a weak pre-
season debut in San Diego.
Uncertainty, though, is mak-
ing it diffcult for the Cow-
boys to see what they really
have coming off a dismal
2013 season.
It doesn’t help that corner-
back Orlando Scandrick will
miss the frst four games of
the regular season because of
a drug suspension.
Dallas coach Garrett basi-
cally ripped the defense after
a 27-7 loss to the Chargers in
the preseason opener, even
though most of the starters
were missing. He was much
more pleased after Saturday’s
37-30 loss to the Ravens.
The Cowboys forced punts
two of the frst three times
Joe Flacco had the ball, and
the only touchdown drive led
by the Baltimore starter was
kept alive by a roughing-the-
passer penalty that Dallas
thought was questionable
enough to send to the league
for review.
On the fip side, that TD
drive ended up going 96
yards — with rookie cor-
nerback Terrance Mitchell
getting beat for the score —
and the second-team defense
offered little resistance on a
touchdown drive to start the
second half.
If you take a step into the spot-
light, you will be able to accom-
plish many of your goals this year.
Your passion for what you do and
the way you express your ideas
will attract attention and the help
of people who can contribute to
your plans.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
Trust your intuition. Get any
deals or promises in writing. If
something seems dubious or
uncertain, look for an alternative
way to get what you want.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Show your support. If you fight
for the underdog, your dedication
will be noticed and commended.
Set a high standard for yourself
that others will follow.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
Problems with your living
space need immediate attention.
Don't let a professional difference
of opinion deteriorate into an
emotional debate. Get your facts
straight before you jeopardize
your position.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
Take action and show everyone
how industrious you are. Be asser-
tive, and present your ideas in a
confident and distinctive manner.
Your enthusiasm will be conta-
gious, and the results will be
impressive.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 23-Dec. 21)
Compromise will be needed in
order to resolve a battle of wills.
Don't cave to pressure or let any-
one bully you. Stand up for what
you believe in and what you
want.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Tread carefully today.
Oversensitive peers and family
members will require an under-
standing and calm approach. This
is an ideal day to work on per-
sonal documents and avoid inter-
action with others.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
Group efforts will go smoothly.
You will be able to get along with
your colleagues, and much will be
accomplished. Take a position of
leadership in order to boost your
popularity.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
Creative projects will keep
your imagination and mind stimu-
lated. All work and no play will
lead to irritability and dissatisfac-
tion. Make romantic plans for the
evening hours.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
You will need a lot of strength
to deal with negative people and
those unable to see the possibili-
ties at hand. Keep your emotions
in check.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
You will be able to get every-
thing done if you focus. Your
generosity and approachable man-
ner will enable you to get the help
needed to reach your goals.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Don't get so caught up in daily
trials that you neglect financial
matters. Be mindful of how your
decisions will influence those
around you. Think before you
act.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Take extra care when it comes
to the way you present who you
are and what you can do. The
compliments you receive will
please you and boost your confi-
dence.
THATABABY
©
by Paul Trap
BIG NATE
©
by Lincoln Peirce
KIT ‘N’ CARLYLE
©
by Larry Wright
ARLO & JANIS
©
by Jimmy Johnson
FRANK & ERNEST
©
by Bob Thaves
THE BORN LOSER
©
by Art and Chip Sansom
THE GRIZZWELLS
©
by Bill Schorr
MONTY
©
by Jim Meddick
ALLEY OOP
©
by Jack and Carole Bender HERMAN
©
by Jim Unger
Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Today is the 232nd day of 2014
and the 61st day of summer.
TODAY'S HISTORY: In 1940,
exiled Russian revolutionary Leon
Trotsky was assassinated in
Mexico.
In 1964, President Lyndon
Johnson signed the Economic
Opportunity Act of 1964, allocating
nearly $1 billion in an unprecedent-
ed anti-poverty measure.
In 1977, NASA launched the
unmanned space probe Voyager 2 to
relay data and photographs of the
outer solar system and interstellar
space.
In 1998, the United States attacked
suspected terrorist bases in Sudan in
retaliation for U.S. embassy bomb-
ings earlier in the month.
TODAY' S BIRTHDAYS:
Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901), 23rd
U.S. president; H.P. Lovecraft (1890-
1937), author; Eero Saarinen (1910-
1961), architect; Don King (1931- ),
boxing promoter; Isaac Hayes (1942-
2008), singer-songwriter; Connie
Chung (1946- ), journalist; Robert
Plant (1948- ), singer-songwriter; Al
Roker (1954- ), TV personality; Joan
Allen (1956- ), actress; David O.
Russell (1958- ), filmmaker; Amy
Adams (1974- ), actress; Andrew
Garfield (1983- ), actor; Demi
Lovato (1992- ), actress.
TODAY'S FACT: Before entering
politics, President Lyndon Johnson
taught public speaking and debate at
a high school in Houston.
TODAY'S SPORTS: In 1938, Lou
Gehrig of the New York Yankees hit
the 23rd grand slam of his career,
setting a record that stood for 75
years, until it was broken by Yankees
slugger Alex Rodriguez in 2013.
TODAY'S QUOTE: "The most
merciful thing in the world, I think,
is the inability of the human mind to
correlate all its contents. We live on a
placid island of ignorance in the midst
of black seas of the infinity, and it
was not meant that we should voyage
far." — H.P. Lovecraft, "The Call of
Cthulhu"
TODAY'S NUMBER: 28,000 —
miles traveled by the first telegram
sent around the world, on this day in
1911. The message reached its origi-
nation point, the dispatch room on the
17th floor of the New York Times
Building, in 16.5 minutes.
TODAY'S MOON: Between last
quarter moon (Aug. 17) and new
moon (Aug. 25).
Q: According to legend, if the
ravens leave the Tower of London,
the empire will fall. How and
when did this legend begin? —
W.U., Clackamas, Oregon
A: Precise details are debated,
but what is known is that the leg-
end started during the reign of
Charles II. Lets do a quick history
lesson: Charles II's father, Charles
I, was beheaded by Oliver
Cromwell and his Pilgrim follow-
ers on Jan. 30, 1649, during the
English Civil War. Cromwell died
in 1658, creating political unrest.
Parliament restored the monarchy
and invited Charles II back to
England, where he reigned from
1660 until 1685.
For reasons that are unclear,
Charles II decided all ravens would
be eradicated from London and
surrounding areas. Charles was
told of the ancient prophecy that if
the ravens were to leave the tower,
the monarchy would fall. I'm not
sure, but I think that was made up
by The Committee to Save the
Ravens. It was decided, possibly
by Charles himself, that six ravens
would be enough to maintain the
legend and the monarchy. To this
day, seven ravens are kept on hand
just in case.
DID YOU KNOW? Miley Ray
Cyrus was given the name Destiny
Hope Cyrus at birth. She later
legally changed her name. "Ray"
is for her grandfather, and "Miley"
was shortened from "Smiley," her
childhood nickname.
Q: I was at a function when a
man dressed in an ancient mili-
tary uniform used a saber to
open a bottle of champagne.
There was a name for this ritual.
Do you know what it is? —
M.H., Lakeway, Texas
A: It is known as "sabrage," a
technique used for opening a
bottle of champagne during cer-
emonial occasions. The dull side
of a sabre breaks away the neck
of the bottle, leaving only the
base. The cork and collar remain
together.
This technique became popu-
lar in France when Napoleon's
army celebrated its many victo-
ries. How and why this unusual
ritual began remains open to
debate.
Speaking of champagne,
Napoleon is credited with say-
ing, "Champagne! In victory
one deserves it; in defeat one
needs it."
Computer users, go to
YouTube.com and search
"sabrage" to see videos of the
act.
ASK MR. KNOW-IT-ALL
By Gary
Clothier
Miley Cyrus
PAGE 10 . . . WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014 Entertainment POTEAU DAILY NEWS
HOROSCOPE
By
Eugenia Last
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
Classifieds
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014 . . . PAGE 11
Deadline of publication is three business days prior to date intended for publication before noon.
We Accept Visa, MasterCard, and Discovery cards. All sales are fnal (No Refunds)
GENERAL INFORMATION:
The Daily News reserves the right to reject, revise, edit
& properly classify all advertising submitted for publica-
tion. We will not knowingly accept advertising which
discriminates because of race, color, religion, national
origin or sex.
YARD SALE RAIN INSURANCE: $3.00
If your yard sale is rained out, (must rain, not sprinkle, off
and on until noon) we will rerun your ad whenever you
choose (per our ad guidelines). Must call next business
day after rained out sale. Insurance expires 30 days after
date of purchase on ad.
ADJUSTMENTS:
Please check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears.
After which time a refund or reprint is limited to one
insertion only. Canceling ads placed at discounted rates
revert to standard prices, therefore a refund may not
apply. Omitted ads are eligible for refund of amount paid
ONLY or appearing in alternate issue.
GUARANTEED SALE - $80:
UP TO ONE (1) YEAR
OF THE PDN/SHOPPER GUIDE
No Real Estate, Hay, Services, Livestock, Horses or Pets.
20 word. max. Additional words 34¢ per word.
Accepting Applications
Management
Must be available to work
Mid-Days and Nights
Apply in person:
3110 N. Broadway, Poteau
Monday - Friday
9 to 11 am & 2 to 4 pm
Ask for Emily
Is it time to change to a job
that you will really love??!!
Our Family Oriented Home Health Agency is seeking
caring dedicated RN’s in the Poteau area and
RNs willing to travel the State of Oklahoma.
Full Time salaried employees enjoy the following benefits:
•Exceptional Orientation/Mentor Program
•Productivity Incentive Program
• Company Car Provided
• Health, Dental & Life Insurance
• AFLAC Policies •Flexible Scheduling
• Up to 18 Vacation Days Per Year
• A Friendly and Compassionate Work Environment
800-465-8380
EOE www.oklahomahealthcaresolutions.com
See photos at: www.disale.com
Cash Only, Please.
Two Separate Sales One Awesome Weekend
105 Winridge Road,
Poteau, OK
Estate of
Jack & Virginia Stanley
1004 Grace Street
Poteau, OK
Costume Jewelry 1/2 Price
Must see to Appreciate
Friday August 22nd and Saturday August 23rd 7:00 A.M.
¸, ¸. . _·.
Image Healthcare is looking for positive
people. We define a positive individual
as one who will acknowledge and per-
severe through adversity. They do not
allow their circumstances to dictate their
attitude. They are pleasant and easy to
be around. If you possess these charac-
ter traits and enjoy working with others
who embrace them, please apply online
at imagehealthcare.com.
We are currently accepting applications
for a full time and a part time LPN/RN.
If you are unfriendly, critical, and you
prefer to grumble and complain then
please do not apply.
POSI TI ON VACANCY
TEACHINGASSISTANT
Poteau Campus
MINIMUMQUALIFICATIONS:
Applicants must possess a high school diploma/equivalent or higher
andbewillingtoassist instructors withthedevelopment anddelivery of
instructiontohighschool andadult students. Career Readiness Certifi-
cate(CRC) andCDL/Buscertificationarepreferred.
PRIMARYFUNCTION:
Thesuccessful candidatewill beanofficeprofessional whowants tobe
a teamplayer with experience working with MS Word, Excel, Access,
etc., write grammatically correct business letters and answer business
phonesappropriately, operateofficemachines, maintainstudent records
andassist campusstaff asneeded.
DEADLINEFORAPPLYING:
August 22, 201412:00PMInterviewsbyinvitationonly.
Askillsexercisemayberequired.
STARTINGDATE: September 10, 2014(10-monthposition)
SALARY:
BasedonKTCSalarySchedule.
Newemployeewill beemployedinitiallyonaTemporaryContract.
(School Lawsof Oklahoma70-6-101.23)
A complete application, transcripts, educational certifications and
resume’ including complete employment experience, verifiable
referencesandother appropriateinformationshouldbesent to:
DOUGHALL
Kiamichi Technology Centers
P.O. BOX825, Poteau, OK74953
Applicationsmaybeobtainedat your nearest KTCcampus,
intheHumanResourcessectionat www.ktc.eduor bycontacting
jwarren@ktc.edu
Kiamichi Technology Center does not discriminate on the basis of
race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, genetic information or
disability, or veteran status. Inquiries concerning this policy may be
referredto: ComplianceCoordinator, POBox548, Wilburton, OK74578.
(888) 567-6807.
Poteau 8 P – 2x6”
Ready for a Career Change?
Are you working late hours only to receive
a disappointing paycheck? Would you
rather work weekday hours for a family
oriented Home Health Agency?
Our Home Health Agency is seeking caring,
dedicated Per Visit LPNs in Poteau. We offer
competitive pay, an excellent working
environment and a great benefit package.
800-465-8380
EOE
www.oklahomahealthcaresolutions.com
800-465-8380
Seeking organized individual for
Full Time Office Position
in Poteau
Multi-phone line, computer experience, good
communication, people skills and
organizational skills. Medical background
preferred, but not required.
Country Style Health Care, Inc. IV
EOE
800-465-8380
Are you looking for a job with
good pay and flexible hours?
Enjoy working with people?
Our Home Care Agency is seeking
Providers (PCAs) in
Bokoshe and Pocola.
No clincial license or training required.
Country Style Health Care, Inc. IV
EOE
800-465-8380
Are you looking for a job with
good pay and flexible hours?
Enjoy working with people?
Our Home Care Agency is seeking
Providers (PCAs) in
Heavener, Poteau and Summerfield areas.
No clincial license or training required.
Country Style Health Care, Inc. IV
EOE
800-465-8380
Ready for a Career Change?
Are you working late hours only to receive a
disappointing paycheck? Would you rather
work weekday hours for a family oriented
Home Health Agency?
Country Style Health Care, Inc. IV
EOE
Our Home health Agency is seeking caring, dedicated
RNs and LPNs in Poteau.
Nurses must have at least 1 year of nursing
experience or a Bachelors degree.
We offer competitive pay, and excellent working
environment and a great benefit package.
CLASSIFIED
ADS
GET
RESULTS!
PDN
804 N. Broadway
Poteau
918-647-3188
POSITION AVAILABLE
• Customer Service •
The Poteau Daily News
is looking for an
Energetic, Outgoing Individual
to join our
Customer Service Team
Experience preferred
but will train the right person.
•This is a full-time position.
•Benefits are available after the
probationary Period.
Pick Up Application at
804 N. Broadway • Poteau
No Phone Calls Please
EOE
SERVING LEFLORE COUNTY
YARD SALES
COOKS
TRADING POST
Before You Have your
Moving Sale or
Estate Sale call
918-654-3045
918-839-4105
We Buy Furniture
Tools, Mowers,
Appliances and
Unique items.
Vender!s Welcome
Tuesday-Saturday
9:00 . -6:00
LOST & FOUND
FOUND: AVADA
West class ring of
!78, with a blue
stone. Has Wildcats
engraved on side.
Please call Keith at
918-635-0411
MISCELLANEOUS
DENNIE SNOW
Restaurant
Equipment
3210-3220 Midland
Fort Smith, Ark
479-242-9595
479-414-9124
Fax: 479-782-1494
WE Buy, Sell and
Trade
Public Welcome
FARM/LIVESTOCK
1953 FORD 8 N
TRACTOR, new
tires, new paint job.
Change to 12 volts.
Runs great, new 5
foot brush hog, 5
foot box bl ade.
$4000. For more
info for to see trac-
t o r . C a l l
918-413-2974
SERVICES
MOBI LE HOME
Transporting. Mov-
i ng, set-up, ti e
downs. Licensed in
Oklahoma & Arkan-
sas. Great Service,
Gr e a t Pr i c e .
800-940-5581.
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE for
Couples with
Minor Children.
All the paper work
you need for $100.
For Information Call
918-839-6040
EMPLOYMENT
ARBUCKLE
TRUCK Driving
School, Inc. Laid
Off? Low income?
No cost grants. Job
ready in 4 weeks.
VA Benefits. Tribal
assi st ance. Job
Placement. Week-
end classes avail-
able. 580-223-3360
MEDI-HOME OF
Arkoma 1008 Ar-
kansas Street, Ar-
koma, OK is now
taking applications
for Dietary Depart-
ment . Apply in per-
son. No phone calls
please.
EMPLOYMENT
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
POCOLA HEALTH
AND REHAB
Is looking for
qualified staff:
RN
FT Weekend Option
40 Hours Available
LPN 3-11 Mon-Fri
CNA’s 3-11
CMA 3-11 Mon-Fri
Apply in person at
Pocola Health
and Rehab
200 Home Street
Pocola, OK 74902
POTEAU SONIC
now hiring for all
positions.! Applica-
tions available at
Pocola sonic. Ex-
cepting application
at the Poteau sonic
on certain days.!
Days and times will
be posted on the
marquee.
EMPLOYMENT
ENGINEER AES
SHADY POINT, a
coal fired co-gen-
eration power plant
located near Pan-
ama, Oklahoma is
seeking an engi-
neer. Desired Quali-
fications: · Bache-
lors of Science de-
gree in Engineering,
preferably in Me-
chanical, Chemical
or Electrical Engi-
neeri ng, wi th a
demonstrated re-
cord of strong proc-
ess and perform-
ance engineering
skills. · Proficient in
computer use with
skills in Microsoft
software packages
and engi neeri ng
Project Manage-
ment software. ·
Power Plant experi-
ence a plus with a
focus performance
improvement pre-
ferred. · Be a self
starter, comfortable
working with mini-
mal direction. · Will-
ingness to be a
“hands-on” member
of the Team when
field work, inspec-
tions, or testing is
required. · US Citi-
zen or Possess an
Unrestri cted US
Work Permit. Excel-
lent Benefits In-
cluded. · Salary
commensurate with
skills & experience.
To apply go online
to:
http://www.aes.com
/careers and search
for job openings un-
der the business
drop down box for
AES Shady Point,
Oklahoma
RECREATIONAL
2009 HARLEY
Sport st er 1200.
2,500 miles. Asking
$ 8 , 5 0 0 . Ca l l
918-448-2074
PRO-TEAM 175
TW Bass Tracker
Boat, used 9 times,
has trolling motor,
garage kept, fully
loaded, lots of ex-
tras, show room
condi t i on, Bass
tracker trailer drive
on. Sel l i ng due
Heal t h i ssues.
$12,800.
479-650-6901 Ft.
Smith
2005 HARLEY
Davi dson, Ul t ra
Classic, 8400 miles,
Blue and Silver with
some extras, Per-
fect condition, Serv-
iced at 8000 at the
Harley Shop. Ask-
ing 11,500.00 Call
918-649-8160
2005 HARLEY
Davi dson, Ul t ra
Classic, 8400 miles,
Blue and Silver with
some extras, Per-
fect condition, Serv-
iced at 8000 at the
Harley Shop. Ask-
ing 11,500.00 Call
918-649-8160
1997-R72
RANGER Boat. 115
Johnson Mot or.
New tires, new bat-
tery. Garage kept, 1
owner.
1479-236-5530
1918-658-5515
1997-R72
RANGER Boat. 115
Johnson Mot or.
New tires, new bat-
tery. Garage kept, 1
owner.
1479-236-5530
1918-658-5515
RECREATIONAL
1973 14! fiberglass
trihull boat. 70hp
Evinrude, and foot
controlled motor.
Live well, bait well
and good trailer.
Very good deck,
carpet and seats.
$2500. 00 cal l
918-649-0923 or
616-607-4093
CAMPERS/
TRAILERS
2010 LORADO
26.5 foot 5th wheel
camper trailer. 1
owner. rear living
area with super
slide, electric jacks,
electric awning, ex-
t enda bumper ,
separate shower
area, queen bed, 2
rocker/chairs. Ex-
cellent condition,
still looks & smells
new, only used 6
times. Need to sell
due to health rea-
sons. $21,500. For
more info, or to see
thi s beauty cal l
918-413-2974.
MUST SELL 2009
Travel Trailer, LR
slide out, bedroom
slide out, micro-
wave, w/d, sleeps
6, like new, no rea-
sonable offer re-
f used. $19000
(918)208-8761
CARS
2008 BMW 535i
Mint condition.
80K miles. New
tires, new Naviga-
tion update, sport
shift, very well
maintained, have
all service records.
Gets great gas
mileage. $19,500
obo. 479 883-1178
TRUCKS/SUVS
C A $ H F OR
CARS/TRUCKS:
Get A Top Dollar
I NSTANT Of f er!
Running or Not.
Damaged?
Wrecked? OK! We
Pay Up To $20,000!
Cal l Tol l Free:
1-800-871-9712
1970 CHEVROLET
c/10 truck, new 307
motor, 3 speed
transmission, runs
good $8,500. nego-
t i a b l e c a l l
918-413-3723 after-
noons
2010 RS SS CA-
MARO yellow &
black $22,000 OBO
918-839-9132
1998 DODGE RAM
318, 165K MILES,
LADDER RACK,
GOOD FARM
/WORKTRUCK
$1,800.00
479-420-4063
MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
COUNTRY LIVING
2BR Double wide
One year lease with
first and last month
p l u s d e p o s i t
$600.00 a month
Handicapped Ac-
cessi bl e, doubl e
carport, Stove and
Refrigerator, Total
electric, water Pd.
Call 918-647-3763.
ESTATE SALE
P.O. Box 113
Poteau, OK 74953
918-647-9185
Danny Baxter • Owner/Manager
1209 S. McKenna
Readers’
Choice
Readers’ Choice Winner
10 Years Running
American
Termite & Pest Control
Loans $100 to $1000
Fixed Income ~ Credit Starter ~ Credit Rebuilder
“WE WANT TO SAY YES!”
A. V. Skinner,
Manager
2003 N. Broadway
(918) 649-0099
PHONE APPLICATIONS Welcome
24 Hour Emergency Roadside Assistance
(918) 647 - 5140
Towing, Unlocks, Jump
Starts, Tire Changes,
Winching and Recovery
Damage Free Service
Heating & Air
Service All Brands of Central
Heat & Air Units & Heat Pumps
15 Years Experience • Licenses & Bonded
Kevin Sims HVAC Troubleshooting Mech
Lic. OK• 80795
26125 Latham Rd - Shady Point, OK 74956
918-963-2417 Cell:918-774-5456
Home Maintenance Service
• Redidential-Commercial Remodeling
• Home Improvement & Repair
• Porches & Decks of all types
• Storage buildings & Garages
• Cabinet Making
• Vinyl Siding & Window Replacement
Free Estimates
Everything from A-Z...If you need it done just call me!
Ken Ellis • 918-647-9550
Reasonable Rates By the Hour or Job
PAGE 12 . . . WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014
Classifieds
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Old
Hwy 59 Heavener,
2 bedroom, 2 bath
mobile home, all
appliances, CH&A,
very cl ean, NO
PETS. $500/month,
$200/deposit.
757-759-0909 or
870-389-6074.
TWO OR THREE
bedroom mobi l e
homes for rent. RV
spaces available
also. Trash and
sewer paid. NO
PETS.
918-647-3923 or
918-774-4624
HOMES FOR RENT
AFFORDABLE
HOUSING
Rent based on
income.
Central Heat/Air
Washer/Dryer
hookups.
Panama, LeFlore
Cowlington, Muse
and Whitesboro
Call Kiamichi
Housing Authority
918-522-4436.
FOR RENT.Garage
apt. unfurnished.
$350/month wi th
$200 deposi t.Al l
bills paid up to
$100.00 207 1/2
Har per . ( 940)
577-5448 after 5:30
p.m.
FOR RENT: 20770
Old Hwy 59 South
Heavener, 2 bed-
r oom f ur ni shed
cabin, private and
peacef ul , appl i -
ances included, wa-
t e r p a i d ,
$400/month,
$200/deposit.
757-759-0909 or
870-389-6074.
MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE
DON’S
MOBILE
HOMES
NEW
ARRIVALS
GREAT NEW
FLOORPLANS
28X80,
4-BEDROOM,
2-BATH, TWO
LIVING AREAS
W/OPEN FLOOR
PLAN. HUGE
PANTRY,
FIREPLACE,
SLIDING GLASS
DOOR,
APPLIANCE
PACKAGE,
LARGE ISLAND
IN KITCHEN
AND DESK...
$76,000.00
16X80 SI PAD,
OPEN FLOOR
PLAN, LOTS
OF CABINETS,
FARM SINK,
ROUGH CEDAR
TRIM AND
THERMAL
WINDOWS....
$39,500.00
(800)940-5581
donsmobilehomes.
com
CLEAN, QUIET 2
Bdrm/1 bath, stove,
refrigerator, washer
dryer hookups, .NO
PETS
918-647-6392 or
918-647-6996
SPECIAL GOV!T
Programs Lenders
offering zero down
with land and less
than perfect credit
programs. New and
Repo homes
available. $1000
furniture allowance
with new home
pur chase WAC
918-437-1870
REAL ESTATE
MLS #6883272
Zero N. SADDLER
ST POT EAU
$10,000 Town &
Country Realty 205
S. McKenna Po-
teau, OK 74953
Cell:
918-649-4966Of-
fice:918-647-
8204Fax:
918-647-9406E-
mail: donjohnston-
realty@gmail.com.
CABIN O 5 acres,
view, access to
Wister Lake; 14
acres in Talihina, 4
Power poles, Rock
Creek, out of city
limits; 140 acres off
grid, hunt, creeks,
springs. Call Valerie
918-429-9925
REAL ESTATE
J.L. Ford
Investments
918-647-2712
We Buy & Sell
FOR SALE
OR TRADE
Calhoun Area
14 Acres on good
road just off of
Calhoun road,
electric and rural
water available,
good building
site with good
views high and
dry, $2500 down
Payments of $225
month at 8%
210 Georgia
Place
in Poteau, large 4
bedroom 2 bath
home in excellent
location in North
Poteau, $97,500
Owner will trade or
help get financing.
911 Burkle
in Poteau, West of
bypass. Nice brick
home with large lot
in private setting;
will be available in
September. Owner
financing with 10%
down
James Ford
479-806-8446
We Buy & Sell
APARTMENTS
1, 2 & 3
BEDROOM
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
HUD & Choctaw
approved.
Poteau Valley
Apartments
918-212-4802.
HUD AND CHOC-
TAW APPROVED
UPDATED! 2BR
1ba apartment $435
a month Washer
and Dryer hoockups
2 0 0 F o l s u m
918-839-4407
479-629-0691
NOW LEASING
1 - 2 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS
Water and Trash
PAID.
HEATHER -
RIVIERA -
GEORGIA PLACE
and SADDLER ST.
Contact Heather
Investments.
1-918-647-2541
FOR SALE BY
OWNER
580C CASE Back-
hoe; 1981 Ford
F 1 5 0 -
4WD/4Speed, 200
Potiac Grand-Am
GT, ALSO 1968
GMC PI CKUP
918-413-2386
LEGALS
U.S. BANK NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION, AS TRUS-
TEE FOR CITI-
GROUP MORT-
GAGE L OAN
TRUST
2007-WFHE2, AS-
SET-BACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES,
SERIES
2007-WFHE2,
Plaintiff,
v.
HURSCHEL BILL-
INGS; SPOUSE, IF
ANY, OF HUR-
SCHEL BILLINGS;
ROBERTA BILL-
INGS; SPOUSE, IF
ANY, OF ROB-
ERTA BILLINGS;
JOHN DOE, OC-
CUPANT; EQUA-
BLE ASCENT FI-
NANCIAL, LLC, AS-
SIGNEE OF GE
CAPITAL CORP.
(WAMU); AND DIS-
COVER BANK
Defendant(s).
C a s e N o .
CJ-2014-50
NOTICE OF SHER-
IFF'S SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN
to Hurschel Billings;
Spouse, if any, of
Hurschel Billings;
Roberta Billings;
Spouse, if any, of
Roberta Billings;
John Doe, Occu-
pant; Equable As-
cent Financial, LLC,
Assignee of GE
Capi t al Cor p.
(WAMU); Discover
Bank that on Sep-
tember 23, 2014, at
10:00 o'clock, a.m.,
at lobby of the
County Courthouse
in Poteau, LeFlore
County, Oklahoma,
the Sheriff of said
County will offer for
sale and sell for
cash at public auc-
tion to the highest
and best bidder,
without appraise-
ment, all that cer-
tain real estate in
LeFl ore County,
Oklahoma, to wit:
THE WEST HALF
OF LOT 4 IN
BLOCK 118 IN THE
SECOND ADDI-
TI ON TO THE
TOWN OF HEAVE-
NER, LEFLORE
COUNTY, OKLA-
HOMA.
PROPERTY AD-
DRESS: 301 E.
Avenue A, Heave-
ner, OK 74937
Subject to taxes
and tax sales, said
property being duly
a p p r a i s e d a t
$22,000.00.
Sale will be made
pursuant to an Or-
der of Sale issued
upon a judgment
entered in the Dis-
t r i ct Cour t of
LeFl ore County,
Oklahoma, in Case
No. CJ-2014-50,
wherein U.S. Bank
National Associa-
tion, as Trustee for
Citigroup Mortgage
L o a n T r u s t
2007-WFHE2, As-
set-Backed
Pass-Through Cer-
t i f i cat es, Seri es
2007-WFHE2 i s
Plaintiff and Hur-
schel Billings and
Roberta Bi l l i ngs
is/are Defendant(s)
to satisfy said judg-
ment in the sum of
$27,429.60 together
wi th i nterest at
10.25% per annum
from August 1,
2013, including late
charges, $1,800.00
for attorney's fee,
$490.00 advances
for ti tl e search,
taxes, insurance,
property preserva-
tion and all costs of
this action accrued
and accruing.
WI TNESS MY
HAND this 14th day
of August, 2014.
BY:
Sheriff
s/BY: Heather Ford
Undersheriff/Deputy
SHAPI RO &
CEJDA, LLC
770 NE 63rd St
Oklahoma City, OK
73105-6431
(405)848-1819
Attorneys for Plain-
tiff
File No. 14-119197
Published in the Po-
teau Daily News on
August 20, 27, 2014
(26049) LPXLP
LEGALS
U.S. BANK NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION, AS TRUS-
TEE FOR CITI-
GROUP MORT-
GAGE L OAN
TRUST
2007-WFHE2, AS-
SET-BACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES,
SERIES
2007-WFHE2,
Plaintiff,
v.
HURSCHEL BILL-
INGS; SPOUSE, IF
ANY, OF HUR-
SCHEL BILLINGS;
ROBERTA BILL-
INGS; SPOUSE, IF
ANY, OF ROB-
ERTA BILLINGS;
JOHN DOE, OC-
CUPANT; EQUA-
BLE ASCENT FI-
NANCIAL, LLC, AS-
SIGNEE OF GE
CAPITAL CORP.
(WAMU); AND DIS-
COVER BANK
Defendant(s).
C a s e N o .
CJ-2014-50
NOTICE OF SHER-
IFF'S SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN
to Hurschel Billings;
Spouse, if any, of
Hurschel Billings;
Roberta Billings;
Spouse, if any, of
Roberta Billings;
John Doe, Occu-
pant; Equable As-
cent Financial, LLC,
Assignee of GE
Capi t al Cor p.
(WAMU); Discover
Bank that on Sep-
tember 23, 2014, at
10:00 o'clock, a.m.,
at lobby of the
County Courthouse
in Poteau, LeFlore
County, Oklahoma,
the Sheriff of said
County will offer for
sale and sell for
cash at public auc-
tion to the highest
and best bidder,
without appraise-
ment, all that cer-
tain real estate in
LeFl ore County,
Oklahoma, to wit:
THE WEST HALF
OF LOT 4 IN
BLOCK 118 IN THE
SECOND ADDI-
TI ON TO THE
TOWN OF HEAVE-
NER, LEFLORE
COUNTY, OKLA-
HOMA.
PROPERTY AD-
DRESS: 301 E.
Avenue A, Heave-
ner, OK 74937
Subject to taxes
and tax sales, said
property being duly
a p p r a i s e d a t
$22,000.00.
Sale will be made
pursuant to an Or-
der of Sale issued
upon a judgment
entered in the Dis-
t r i ct Cour t of
LeFl ore County,
Oklahoma, in Case
No. CJ-2014-50,
wherein U.S. Bank
National Associa-
tion, as Trustee for
Citigroup Mortgage
L o a n T r u s t
2007-WFHE2, As-
set-Backed
Pass-Through Cer-
t i f i cat es, Seri es
2007-WFHE2 i s
Plaintiff and Hur-
schel Billings and
Roberta Bi l l i ngs
is/are Defendant(s)
to satisfy said judg-
ment in the sum of
$27,429.60 together
wi th i nterest at
10.25% per annum
from August 1,
2013, including late
charges, $1,800.00
for attorney's fee,
$490.00 advances
for ti tl e search,
taxes, insurance,
property preserva-
tion and all costs of
this action accrued
and accruing.
WI TNESS MY
HAND this 14th day
of August, 2014.
BY:
Sheriff
s/BY: Heather Ford
Undersheriff/Deputy
SHAPI RO &
CEJDA, LLC
770 NE 63rd St
Oklahoma City, OK
73105-6431
(405)848-1819
Attorneys for Plain-
tiff
File No. 14-119197
Published in the Po-
teau Daily News on
August 20, 27, 2014
(26049) LPXLP
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Indian Nations
Council Boy Scouts
of America (BSA),
located at 4295 S.
Gar net t Road,
Tulsa, Oklahoma
74146, submitted a
renewal Application
for Permit to Dis-
charge
Municipal/Domestic
Wastewater to the
Oklahoma Depart-
ment of Environ-
ment al Qual i t y
(ODEQ) on August
14, 2014. The ap-
plication is to allow
discharge of munici-
pal wastewater from
t he wast ewat er
treatment lagoon
system at the Hale
Scout Reservation
l ocated approxi -
mately 10 miles
east of Talihina,
Oklahoma. The le-
gal description of
the facility is S 1/2
of the NE 1/4 of the
NE 1/4 of Section
16, Township 3N,
Range 23E, Indian
Meridian in LeFlore
County, Oklahoma.
The discharge point
is located at 34° 44!
07.933” N and 94°
53! 16.923” W and
the legal description
is SW 1/4 of the SW
1/4 of the NE 1/4 of
Section 16, Town-
ship 3N, Range
23E, Indian Merid-
i an i n LeFl ore
County, Oklahoma.
The receiving water
is Bohannon Creek.
The application is
available for review
at the ODEQ, 707
North Robi nson,
Okl ahoma Ci t y,
Oklahoma 73101,
(405) 702-8100 or
at the BSA!s office
i n Tul sa l i st ed
above. For ques-
tions, the ODEQ
can be contacted as
listed above or the
applicant!s repre-
sentative, Melissa
Vaught, Cardinal
Engi neer i ng at
mv@cardinalengi-
neers.com,
405.842.1066.
Published in the Po-
teau Daily News on
August 20, 2014
(26052) LPXLP
ALIAS
NOTICE OF SHER-
IFF'S SALE
CJ-2010-119
Notice is given that
on the 23 day of
September, 2014,
at 10:00 a.m. , at
the Front door of
the County Court-
house, in the City of
Poteau, LeFl ore
County, Oklahoma,
the Sheriff of said
County will offer for
sale and sell, with
appraisement, for
cash, at public auc-
tion, to the highest
and best bidder, all
that certain real es-
tate i n LeFl ore
County, Oklahoma,
to-wit:
That part of Lot 9,
Block 199 in the
Ci ty of Poteau,
more particularly
described as fol-
lows: Beginning at
the Northeasterly
Corner of Lot 6,
Block 199, same
being formed by the
i nt er sect i on of
South Harper Street
and alley running
through Block 199;
thence in a South-
westerly direction
on the Easterly line
of Lots 6 and 7 and
the Northerly 100
feet of Lot 9 for a
point of beginning;
thence in a West-
erly direction and
parallel with the
Northerly boundary
line of said Lot 9 to
the Westerly line of
said Lot 9; thence in
a Southerly direc-
tion along the West-
erly line of said Lot
to the Southwest-
erly corner of said
Lot; thence in a
Northeasterly direc-
tion along the East-
erly line of said Lot
for a distance of
105.7 feet to the
Point of Beginning;
subject to unpaid
taxes, advance-
ments by Plaintiff
for taxes, insurance
premiums, and ex-
penses necessary
for the preservation
of the subject prop-
erty, if any, said
propert y havi ng
been dul y ap-
p r a i s e d a t
$29,000.00. Sale
will be made pursu-
ant to an Alias Spe-
cial Execution And
Order Of Sale is-
sued in accordance
with judgment en-
tered in the District
Court of LeFlore
County, Oklahoma,
i n Case No.
CJ-2010-119, enti-
tled Bank of Amer-
ica, N.A., successor
by merger to BAC
Home Loans Serv-
i ci ng, L. P. f ka
Countrywide Home
Loans Servicing,
L.P., Plaintiff, vs.
Adam Mirick, Ash-
ley Mirick, John
Doe, Jane Doe, Se-
curi t y Bankcard
Center, being all of
the Defendants and
persons holding or
claiming any inter-
est or lien in the
subject property.
Rob Seale, Sheriff
LeFl ore County,
Oklahoma
s/BY: Heather Ford
DEPUTY
JAMES H. THIES-
SEN - #20354
BAER, TIMBER-
LAKE, COULSON
& CATES, P.C.
Attorneys for Plain-
tiff
P.O. Box 18486
Oklahoma City, OK
73154-0486
Telephone:(405)
842-7722
Facsimile:(405)
848-9349
File No. 63884
Published in the Po-
teau Daily News on
August 20, 27, 2014
(26050)LPXLP
LEGALS
ALIAS
NOTICE OF SHER-
IFF'S SALE
CJ-2010-119
Notice is given that
on the 23 day of
September, 2014,
at 10:00 a.m. , at
the Front door of
the County Court-
house, in the City of
Poteau, LeFl ore
County, Oklahoma,
the Sheriff of said
County will offer for
sale and sell, with
appraisement, for
cash, at public auc-
tion, to the highest
and best bidder, all
that certain real es-
tate i n LeFl ore
County, Oklahoma,
to-wit:
That part of Lot 9,
Block 199 in the
Ci ty of Poteau,
more particularly
described as fol-
lows: Beginning at
the Northeasterly
Corner of Lot 6,
Block 199, same
being formed by the
i nt er sect i on of
South Harper Street
and alley running
through Block 199;
thence in a South-
westerly direction
on the Easterly line
of Lots 6 and 7 and
the Northerly 100
feet of Lot 9 for a
point of beginning;
thence in a West-
erly direction and
parallel with the
Northerly boundary
line of said Lot 9 to
the Westerly line of
said Lot 9; thence in
a Southerly direc-
tion along the West-
erly line of said Lot
to the Southwest-
erly corner of said
Lot; thence in a
Northeasterly direc-
tion along the East-
erly line of said Lot
for a distance of
105.7 feet to the
Point of Beginning;
subject to unpaid
taxes, advance-
ments by Plaintiff
for taxes, insurance
premiums, and ex-
penses necessary
for the preservation
of the subject prop-
erty, if any, said
propert y havi ng
been dul y ap-
p r a i s e d a t
$29,000.00. Sale
will be made pursu-
ant to an Alias Spe-
cial Execution And
Order Of Sale is-
sued in accordance
with judgment en-
tered in the District
Court of LeFlore
County, Oklahoma,
i n Case No.
CJ-2010-119, enti-
tled Bank of Amer-
ica, N.A., successor
by merger to BAC
Home Loans Serv-
i ci ng, L. P. f ka
Countrywide Home
Loans Servicing,
L.P., Plaintiff, vs.
Adam Mirick, Ash-
ley Mirick, John
Doe, Jane Doe, Se-
curi t y Bankcard
Center, being all of
the Defendants and
persons holding or
claiming any inter-
est or lien in the
subject property.
Rob Seale, Sheriff
LeFl ore County,
Oklahoma
s/BY: Heather Ford
DEPUTY
JAMES H. THIES-
SEN - #20354
BAER, TIMBER-
LAKE, COULSON
& CATES, P.C.
Attorneys for Plain-
tiff
P.O. Box 18486
Oklahoma City, OK
73154-0486
Telephone:(405)
842-7722
Facsimile:(405)
848-9349
File No. 63884
Published in the Po-
teau Daily News on
August 20, 27, 2014
(26050)LPXLP
NOTICE OF SHER-
IFF'S SALE
CJ-2014-96
Notice is given that
on the 23rd day of
September, 2014,
at 10:00 a.m., at the
Front door of the
County Courthouse,
in the City of Po-
t eau, LeFl or e
County, Oklahoma,
the Sheriff of said
County will offer for
sale and sell, with
appraisement, for
cash, at public auc-
tion, to the highest
and best bidder, all
that certain real es-
tate i n LeFl ore
County, Oklahoma,
to-wit:Part of the
Southwest Quarter
of the Southwest
Quart er of t he
Northeast Quarter
and part of the
Northwest quarter
of the Northwest
Quart er of t he
Southeast Quarter
Section 18, Town-
ship 8 North, Range
25 East of the In-
dian Base and Me-
r i di an, Lef l or e
County, Oklahoma,
more particularly
described as fol-
lows: COMMENC-
ING at the North-
east corner of said
Section 18; thence
South 88 degrees
22 minutes 11 sec-
onds West, along
the North line of
said Section 18, a
distance of 1108.36
feet; thence South
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
East a distance of
3306. 81 f eet ;
thence South 88
degrees 21 minutes
20 seconds West a
distance of 1186.93
feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING;
thence South 88
degrees 21 minutes
20 seconds West a
distance of 293.46
feet; thence North
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
West a distance of
743.78 feet; thence
North 88 degrees
22 minutes 11 sec-
onds East a dis-
tance of 293.46
feet; thence South
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 50 seconds
East a distance of
743.70 feet to the
POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. AND Part of
t he Sout heast
Quart er of t he
Southeast Quarter
of the Northwest
Quarter and part of
the Northeast Quar-
ter of the Northeast
Quart er of t he
Southwest Quarter
of Sect i on 18,
Township 8 North,
Range 25 East of
the Indian Base and
Meridian, Leflore
County, Oklahoma,
more particularly
described as fol-
lows: COMMENC-
ING at the North-
east corner of said
Section 18; thence
South 88 degrees
22 minutes 11 sec-
onds West, along
the North line of
said Section 18, a
distance of 1108.36
feet; thence South
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
East a distance of
3306. 81 f eet ;
thence South 88
degrees 21 minutes
20 seconds West a
distance of 1480.39
feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING;
thence South 88
degrees 21 minutes
20 seconds West a
distance of 293.45
feet; thence North
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
West a distance of
743.85 feet; thence
North 88 degrees
22 minutes 11 sec-
onds East a dis-
tance of 293.45
feet; thence South
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
East a distance of
743.78 feet to the
POINT OF BEGIN-
NI NG. Toget her
with Manufactured
Housi ng: 2007
Clayton, Model Leg-
end Colonial, 31 x
68.30, Serial No.
CSS008131TXAB;
subject to unpaid
taxes, advance-
ments by Plaintiff
for taxes, insurance
premiums, and ex-
penses necessary
for the preservation
of the subject prop-
erty, if any, said
propert y havi ng
been dul y ap-
p r a i s e d a t
$80,000.00. Sale
will be made pursu-
ant to a Special
Execution And Or-
der Of Sale issued
in accordance with
judgment entered in
the District Court of
LeFl ore County,
Oklahoma, in Case
No. CJ-2014-96,
entitled Taylor Bean
& Whitaker Mort-
gage Corp, Plaintiff,
vs. Steven Eugene
Car pent er and
Brenda Lee Car-
penter, being all of
the Defendants and
persons holding or
claiming any inter-
est or lien in the
subject property.
Rob Seale, Sheriff
of
LeFl ore County,
Oklahoma
s/By: Heather Ford
DEPUTY
James H. Thiessen
- # 20354
BAER, TIMBER-
LAKE, COULSON
& CATES, P.C.
P.O. Box 18486
Oklahoma City, OK
73154-0486
Telephone: (405)
842-7722
Facsi mi l e: (405)
848-9349
BTCC Fi l e No.:
108057
Published in the Po-
teau Daily News on
August 20, 27, 2014
(26051) LPXLP
LEGALS
NOTICE OF SHER-
IFF'S SALE
CJ-2014-96
Notice is given that
on the 23rd day of
September, 2014,
at 10:00 a.m., at the
Front door of the
County Courthouse,
in the City of Po-
t eau, LeFl or e
County, Oklahoma,
the Sheriff of said
County will offer for
sale and sell, with
appraisement, for
cash, at public auc-
tion, to the highest
and best bidder, all
that certain real es-
tate i n LeFl ore
County, Oklahoma,
to-wit:Part of the
Southwest Quarter
of the Southwest
Quart er of t he
Northeast Quarter
and part of the
Northwest quarter
of the Northwest
Quart er of t he
Southeast Quarter
Section 18, Town-
ship 8 North, Range
25 East of the In-
dian Base and Me-
r i di an, Lef l or e
County, Oklahoma,
more particularly
described as fol-
lows: COMMENC-
ING at the North-
east corner of said
Section 18; thence
South 88 degrees
22 minutes 11 sec-
onds West, along
the North line of
said Section 18, a
distance of 1108.36
feet; thence South
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
East a distance of
3306. 81 f eet ;
thence South 88
degrees 21 minutes
20 seconds West a
distance of 1186.93
feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING;
thence South 88
degrees 21 minutes
20 seconds West a
distance of 293.46
feet; thence North
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
West a distance of
743.78 feet; thence
North 88 degrees
22 minutes 11 sec-
onds East a dis-
tance of 293.46
feet; thence South
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 50 seconds
East a distance of
743.70 feet to the
POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. AND Part of
t he Sout heast
Quart er of t he
Southeast Quarter
of the Northwest
Quarter and part of
the Northeast Quar-
ter of the Northeast
Quart er of t he
Southwest Quarter
of Sect i on 18,
Township 8 North,
Range 25 East of
the Indian Base and
Meridian, Leflore
County, Oklahoma,
more particularly
described as fol-
lows: COMMENC-
ING at the North-
east corner of said
Section 18; thence
South 88 degrees
22 minutes 11 sec-
onds West, along
the North line of
said Section 18, a
distance of 1108.36
feet; thence South
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
East a distance of
3306. 81 f eet ;
thence South 88
degrees 21 minutes
20 seconds West a
distance of 1480.39
feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING;
thence South 88
degrees 21 minutes
20 seconds West a
distance of 293.45
feet; thence North
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
West a distance of
743.85 feet; thence
North 88 degrees
22 minutes 11 sec-
onds East a dis-
tance of 293.45
feet; thence South
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
East a distance of
743.78 feet to the
POINT OF BEGIN-
NI NG. Toget her
with Manufactured
Housi ng: 2007
Clayton, Model Leg-
end Colonial, 31 x
68.30, Serial No.
CSS008131TXAB;
subject to unpaid
taxes, advance-
ments by Plaintiff
for taxes, insurance
premiums, and ex-
penses necessary
for the preservation
of the subject prop-
erty, if any, said
propert y havi ng
been dul y ap-
p r a i s e d a t
$80,000.00. Sale
will be made pursu-
ant to a Special
Execution And Or-
der Of Sale issued
in accordance with
judgment entered in
the District Court of
LeFl ore County,
Oklahoma, in Case
No. CJ-2014-96,
entitled Taylor Bean
& Whitaker Mort-
gage Corp, Plaintiff,
vs. Steven Eugene
Car pent er and
Brenda Lee Car-
penter, being all of
the Defendants and
persons holding or
claiming any inter-
est or lien in the
subject property.
Rob Seale, Sheriff
of
LeFl ore County,
Oklahoma
s/By: Heather Ford
DEPUTY
James H. Thiessen
- # 20354
BAER, TIMBER-
LAKE, COULSON
& CATES, P.C.
P.O. Box 18486
Oklahoma City, OK
73154-0486
Telephone: (405)
842-7722
Facsi mi l e: (405)
848-9349
BTCC Fi l e No.:
108057
Published in the Po-
teau Daily News on
August 20, 27, 2014
(26051) LPXLP
LEGALS
NOTICE OF SHER-
IFF'S SALE
CJ-2014-96
Notice is given that
on the 23rd day of
September, 2014,
at 10:00 a.m., at the
Front door of the
County Courthouse,
in the City of Po-
t eau, LeFl or e
County, Oklahoma,
the Sheriff of said
County will offer for
sale and sell, with
appraisement, for
cash, at public auc-
tion, to the highest
and best bidder, all
that certain real es-
tate i n LeFl ore
County, Oklahoma,
to-wit:Part of the
Southwest Quarter
of the Southwest
Quart er of t he
Northeast Quarter
and part of the
Northwest quarter
of the Northwest
Quart er of t he
Southeast Quarter
Section 18, Town-
ship 8 North, Range
25 East of the In-
dian Base and Me-
r i di an, Lef l or e
County, Oklahoma,
more particularly
described as fol-
lows: COMMENC-
ING at the North-
east corner of said
Section 18; thence
South 88 degrees
22 minutes 11 sec-
onds West, along
the North line of
said Section 18, a
distance of 1108.36
feet; thence South
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
East a distance of
3306. 81 f eet ;
thence South 88
degrees 21 minutes
20 seconds West a
distance of 1186.93
feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING;
thence South 88
degrees 21 minutes
20 seconds West a
distance of 293.46
feet; thence North
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
West a distance of
743.78 feet; thence
North 88 degrees
22 minutes 11 sec-
onds East a dis-
tance of 293.46
feet; thence South
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 50 seconds
East a distance of
743.70 feet to the
POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. AND Part of
t he Sout heast
Quart er of t he
Southeast Quarter
of the Northwest
Quarter and part of
the Northeast Quar-
ter of the Northeast
Quart er of t he
Southwest Quarter
of Sect i on 18,
Township 8 North,
Range 25 East of
the Indian Base and
Meridian, Leflore
County, Oklahoma,
more particularly
described as fol-
lows: COMMENC-
ING at the North-
east corner of said
Section 18; thence
South 88 degrees
22 minutes 11 sec-
onds West, along
the North line of
said Section 18, a
distance of 1108.36
feet; thence South
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
East a distance of
3306. 81 f eet ;
thence South 88
degrees 21 minutes
20 seconds West a
distance of 1480.39
feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING;
thence South 88
degrees 21 minutes
20 seconds West a
distance of 293.45
feet; thence North
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
West a distance of
743.85 feet; thence
North 88 degrees
22 minutes 11 sec-
onds East a dis-
tance of 293.45
feet; thence South
02 degrees 01 min-
utes 49 seconds
East a distance of
743.78 feet to the
POINT OF BEGIN-
NI NG. Toget her
with Manufactured
Housi ng: 2007
Clayton, Model Leg-
end Colonial, 31 x
68.30, Serial No.
CSS008131TXAB;
subject to unpaid
taxes, advance-
ments by Plaintiff
for taxes, insurance
premiums, and ex-
penses necessary
for the preservation
of the subject prop-
erty, if any, said
propert y havi ng
been dul y ap-
p r a i s e d a t
$80,000.00. Sale
will be made pursu-
ant to a Special
Execution And Or-
der Of Sale issued
in accordance with
judgment entered in
the District Court of
LeFl ore County,
Oklahoma, in Case
No. CJ-2014-96,
entitled Taylor Bean
& Whitaker Mort-
gage Corp, Plaintiff,
vs. Steven Eugene
Car pent er and
Brenda Lee Car-
penter, being all of
the Defendants and
persons holding or
claiming any inter-
est or lien in the
subject property.
Rob Seale, Sheriff
of
LeFl ore County,
Oklahoma
s/By: Heather Ford
DEPUTY
James H. Thiessen
- # 20354
BAER, TIMBER-
LAKE, COULSON
& CATES, P.C.
P.O. Box 18486
Oklahoma City, OK
73154-0486
Telephone: (405)
842-7722
Facsi mi l e: (405)
848-9349
BTCC Fi l e No.:
108057
Published in the Po-
teau Daily News on
August 20, 27, 2014
(26051) LPXLP
IN THE DISTRICT
C OU R T OF
LEFLORE
COUNTY,
OKLAHOMA
Wi l burt on St at e
Bank, a banking
corporation,
Plaintiff,
-vs-
Fay V. Sockey, et
al.,
Defendants.
No. CJ-2014-95
NOTICE OF SHER-
IFF'S SALE
Notice is given that
on the 23rd day of
September, 2014 at
10:00 o'clock A.M.,
at the Sheriff's Of-
fice in the Court-
house in LeFlore
County, Oklahoma,
the undersi gned
Sheri f f of sai d
County will offer for
sale and sell, with
appraisement, for
cash, at public auc-
tion, to the highest
and best bidder, all
that certain real es-
tate i n LeFl ore
County, Oklahoma,
to-wit:
Lots Four (4) and
Fi ve (5), Bl ock
Thirty-Eight (38) in
t he Town of
Talihina, LeFlore
County, Oklahoma
with the buildings
and improvements
and the appurte-
nances, heredita-
ments, and all other
rights thereunto ap-
pertaining or be-
longing, and all fix-
tures there or there-
after attached or
used in connection
with said premises,
subject to unpaid
taxes, advance-
ments by Plaintiff
for taxes, insurance
premiums, and ex-
penses necessary
for the preservation
of the subject prop-
erty, if any, said
propert y havi ng
been dul y ap-
praised as follows:
Apprai sed Val ue
$15,000.00
Sale will be made
pursuant to order of
sale issued in ac-
cordance with judg-
ment entered in the
District Court of
LeFl ore County,
Oklahoma in Case
No. CJ-2014-95 en-
titled The Commu-
nity State Bank vs.
Fay V. Sockey, et
al., to satisfy a judg-
ment and lien in the
a m o u n t o f
$19,726.35 princi-
pal plus $5,286.63
interest to May 5,
2014; the sum of
$1,300.00.00 for
abstracting; the
sum of $360.00 for
late charges; for the
f urt her sum of
$2,500.00 for the
Plaintiff's attorney
fees, and for all
costs of this action,
all with interest
thereon at the rate
of $5.31 per diem
until paid.
The balance, if any,
to be paid to the
Clerk of this Court
to await the further
order of the Court.
WITNESS my hand
this 15th day of
August, 2014.
SHERI FF OF
LEFLORE
COUNTY, OKLA-
HOMA
BY: Kendall Morgan
Deputy
THOMPSON &
THOMPSON, AT-
TORNEYS
Sarah M. Jordan,
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 905-300
S. Church St.
Poteau, Oklahoma
74953
Phone:
918-647-4283
Published in the Po-
teau Daily News on
August 20, 27, 2014
(26055) LPXLP
LEGAL
DEADLINE
NEW
DEADLINE
ALL
LEGALS
NEED TO BE
SUBMITTED
THREE (3) DAYS
PRIOR TO DATE
OF PUBLICATION
BEFORE NOON
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
Classifieds
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014 . . . PAGE 13
Getting a Poor Response from
Your Advertising?
Our Newspaper Produces
Immediate Results
Coupons get clipped. Recipes get made. Telephone numbers get called.
Parking spaces get filled up. Cash registers ring.
Surprised? You really shouldn’t be because our readers buy our paper,
not only for the news, but also for the advertising. Our readers are
motivated to buy. Our readers have more disposable income. So you
don’t have to settle for second best . . . let our readers get your sales
hopping.
804 N. Broadway, Poteau, OK
918-647-3188 º fax 918-647-8198
www.poteaudailynews.com
Work It
List It
Rent It
Enjoy It
Place Your Classified Ad Today!!!!!
Call Sharon Today at 918-647-3188
SERVING LEFLORE COUNTY
SERVING LEFLORE COUNTY
Un
Contested
Divorce
With
Minor
Children
or
Without
Children
All the
Paper work
you Need!
For more
Information
And
Pricing call
839-6040
Save Money
Go Pro/Se
R a n d y
B r i d g ma n ,
c o mmi t t e e
member of
Poteau Main
Street Matters
looks at a rep-
lica of the
1930s Central
National Bank
robbed by the
Bonnie and
Clyde Gang.
The picture
and the infor-
mation about
the robbery
are posted on
t h e
Mc Cr o s k e y
Building.
The 10th Annual Poteau Main
Street Golf Tournament was a
huge success! To date, this was
one of the largest tournaments
we’ve had. A total of 14 teams
played in the four man scramble.
First place in the tournament was
the Allstate team with a score of
-18. Second place was C2 Supply
with -18. Coming in third was
Bridgman’s team. Women's clos-
est to the Hole was Hannah Ward
and men's closest to the hole was
Mark Burnett.
Special thanks to our hole
sponsors: Central National Bank,
The LeFlore County Museum at
Hotel Lowrey, Evans & Miller
Funeral Home, GCT Printing,
Watson Motors, Jenson
Enterprises, Northside Liquor,
Barber & Barber Attorney, AES
of Shady Point, Community State
Bank, First National Bank, Poteau
Tag Agency, James Lockhart,
Adams Abstract, AARC Towing
and Recovery, Young's Pharmacy,
Hometown Drug Company,
Leming Ins., Ted Kondos
Denistry, Hammons Heating &
Air, Blackfork Finance, American
Termite & Pest Control, Sherwin
Williams, Blake Trucking, Ann
Weaver, Mark Allen, and Marion
Fry.
Thank you to our food and
prize sponsors as well: Wayne
Enterprises, McDonald's, First
National Bank, Central National
Bank, Oklahoma Welcome, Long
Lake Resort, Jack's Jewelers,
Charles Hollingsworth, and GTZ
Auto Detail.
All proceeds from our golf
tournament go towards the down-
town façade program.
Main Street
Karla Holt, President
John Sullivan, Vice President
Suanna Rust, Treasurer
Young’s
Pharmacy
219 Dewey, Poteau
647-2113
• Free Delivery
• Hospice Prescriptions
• Accept All Insurance Plans
• New Witte Street Drive-Thru
(In Alley)
• New Back Door Entrance For
Your Convenience!
Jim Cook
TJ Holt
Thoughtfulness
411 Dewey Ave.
Poteau, OK
918-647-2238
1-800-508-2282
evansmillerfh@yahoo.com
225 Dewey
P.O. Box 1419
Poteau, OK 74953
918-647-4747
Jodi Hoffman
Jodih@windstream.net
312 Dewey
647-3144
STONE’S
FURNITURE
307 Dewey
647-7138
• Made in the USA •
Downtown Poteau
647-3243 • 888-875-5554
www.bridgmanfurniture.net
REVOLVING
CHARGE
118th
Anniversary Sale
20%-50% OFF
• Furniture • Gifts
• Accessories
Poteau
True Value
Hardware
101 Clayton,
Poteau
918-647-3808
Get outstanding low prices
on quality products.
©2012 by True Value
®
Company. All rights reserved.
Find the right products for your project and expert advice at True Value.
APRIL
SAVE OVER 50%
11
99
reg. 24.99
2-Gal. Back Reliever
Sprayer Pump handle
extends to a comfortable
height. 24" telescoping wand.
L 131 388 1 While supplies last.
SPECIAL PURCHASE
16
97
2-Pc. Lopper & Pruner
Tool Set Cuts cleanly.
Hardened steel nonstick
blades and comfort-grip
handles. L 147 932 B6
While supplies last.
SAVE 50%
1
99
SAVE 25%
11
99
reg. 15.99
16-Lb. Weed & Feed
Lawn Fertilizer
Provides 5,000 sq.-ft. of
coverage. Controls over
200 broadleaf weeds.
Phosphorus free.
L 128 393 120
While supplies last.
reg. 3.99
Solar Pathway Light
Bright white LED. Automatically
turns on at dusk. 3" dia., 10
7
/8" tall
design with on/off switch.
E 141 560 F16 While supplies last.
Sale ends 04/30/12
Poteau True Value
101 Clayton Ave.
Poteau, Ok 74953
918-647-3808
BOARD MEMBERS
Justin Porter
Jim Huckert
Tosha Brand
David Deaton
EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS
Office:
Witte Street -
Old Lowrey Hotel,
Poteau, OK
(918) 647-8648
poteaumainstreet@
windstream.net
Eric Standridge, Main Street Matters Director
Michelle Soriano, Main Street Matters Office Manager
Light, Medium and
Heavy Duty Towing
24/7 Roadside Assistance
918-647-5140
204 Rogers Ave.,
Poteau, OK
facebook.com/aarctowing
www.aarctowing.com
FOR RENT DOWNTOWN:
Properties are also listed on PoteauMainStreetMatters.com
Click on For Rent
104 Witte Ste. 1F & 1H — Contact LeFlore County
Historical Society, 918-647-9330
107 Dewey Ave #3 — 918-647-6199
(Apartment for Rent)
200 Dewey Ave — 918-647-3243
222 Dewey Ave. — 800 Sq. Ft. small -sized retail space,
perfect for gift shop or other retail venture, nice
frontage, 918-647-3243
304 Dewey — 2,500 Sq. Ft. large retail space, unit with
a lot of character
308 Dewey Ave — Contact Connie Wise Realty,
918-647-4257, website cwiseRE.com
FOR SALE:
112 N. Witte - 3,750 Sq. Ft. beautifully remodeled
two story unit
113 S. Witte Street — contact Alliance Realty, Bill Hill,
918-649-3520
113 A S. Witte Street — contact Alliance Realty, Bill
Hill, 918-649-3520
Poteau Main Street Matters could not succeed if it
wasn’t for our members. We want to send a big Thank
You to all our members for their continued support.
For those who haven’t become members yet, now
is the time. Our member base keeps the Poteau Main
Street Matters program running. The more members
we have, the more we can do for the downtown area.
By the end of March, our goal is to have at least 100
new members.
We have an exciting new way to become a mem-
ber. Through our Sustaining Membership, you now can
log on to PoteauMainStreetMatters.com and select the
payment that you’re most comfortable with, be it $5 a
month or $50 a month.
If you have any questions, please give us a call at
(918) 647-8648, or find us on Facebook at Facebook.
com/poteaumainstreet.
Corporate Sponsors:
AES
Platinum Sponsors:
Central National Bank
Community State Bank
Gold Sponsors:
Walmart
Silver Sponsors:
Adam’s Abstract
Young’s Pharmacy
OG&E
Evans & Miller
Hammond Family Dental
Hometown Drug Co.
JoB Construction
Kp’s Quick Mart
Jack’s Jewelers
Susan Jenson
Membership Drive
Take part in the
Downtown Challenge!
Contact us for details!
Visit our website
at
PoteauMainStreetMatters.com
For information about the
many programs that we have
going on.
918- 647- 4511
800- 527- 1916
Doing Business
for 30 Years
In House
Embroidery
& Screen Printing
Embroidery,
Screen Printing &
Ad Specialties
315 Dewey Ave.
Poteau, OK
Thrift &
Salvage
Alley Cat
520 Dewey
Lunch Hr.
Located in the parking lot next
to Alley Cat Thrift & Salvage at
520 Dewey Ave. in Poteau
OPEN 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Monday – Friday
J & J PAWN
522 Dewey Avenue
Salvation Army
Thrift Store
400 Dewey Ave
Poteau
(918)647-8780
vvvvvvvvvvvv
vvvvvvvvvvvv
Help Revitalize
Downtown!
Become
A Member
Today!
vvvvvvvvvvvv
vvvvvvvvvvvv
BOOTHS AVAILABLE:
Both Junebug Antique Mall and Peppercorn Antique Mall have small booths available for those who
wish to have a location to sell their product. Contact the stores for more details.
a
t
t
e
r
s
Golf tournie a huge hit
Register early for
our 2nd annual
Zombie Run. The
Zombie Run will be
held on Oct. 11th,
2014, in Historic
Old Town Poteau.
You can register by
contacting the office
at (918) 647-8648,
or send us a mes-
sage on Facebook
at facebook.com/
poteaumainstreet.
Zombie Run
Have you ever wanted to get
involved, but didn’t know how?
Here’s your chance. Throughout
the year, we will be putting out
“Downtown Challenges.” These
projects challenge people to get
involved.
The first challenge is the
Harvest/Halloween Challenge.
This challenge comes in two
parts.
The “Old Town Harvest”
Challenge invites the communi-
ty to get involved in decorating
downtown Poteau a harvest
theme.
Help decorate the Old Town
district in a harvest theme.
Awards will be given to the
best-decorated store windows
and sidewalk areas. To enter in
the contest, stop by the Poteau
Main Street office. Simply pick
an area to decorate, sign up for
the contest, and get started.
Donate to the cause:
We need harvest decoration
items. Examples include items
such as hay bales, scarecrows,
pumpkins, wreaths, etc.
The “Haunted Halloween”
Challenge again invites the com-
munity to help decorate the
Town Square for Halloween.
Help decorate the Town
Square in a haunted Halloween
theme. We are looking to put
together a group of around 5 to
10 people with great ideas to
transform the Town Square into
a haunted walk-through.
Donate to the cause:
We need Halloween decora-
tion items; the spookier, the bet-
ter.
If you want to get involved,
contact Poteau Main Street mat-
ters at (918) 647-8648.
Ricky Ryburn
The The
LeFlore County
Museum at Hotel
Lowrey is work-
ing on an awning
sponsorship pro-
gram. These
awnings will be
placed on the
building to help
bring back the look and feel
of the 1920’s Lowrey Hotel.
If you’re interested in spon-
soring an awning, or would
like to donate to help com-
plete the museum, contact
Lorie Rutledge,
executive direc-
tor, at (918) 647-
9330.
The historical
society is also
hosting the annu-
al Taste of
LeFlore County
on October 23rd.
They are looking for people
who would like to partici-
pate, with an emphasis on
food that was grown, raised,
or even prepared in LeFlore
County.
What's up at
the Museum
Aug. 2014
A look back in time
Lori Rutledge
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
State
WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 20, 2014 . . . PAGE 15
ARKOMA
AMERICAN
LENDERS SERVICE
CO
PO BOX 330
ANTHONY O J
PO BOX 421
ARKOMA
INDEPENDENT
SCHOOL DIST
FBO MARLA L
PEARSON, P O
BOX 349
BAKER JANE G MS
109 WESTVIEW DR
BOGGS HAROLD
RR 1
CANTY STEVE
930 N LYDIA
CONLEY PAULINE
PO BOX 24
DAVIDS APPLIANCE
828 REED ST
HENRY BENNY E
1017 FALCONER ST
HENRY MARTA J
1017 FALCONER ST
HOLMES FERN V
PO BOX 86
MCGRATH GEORGIA
352 CHOCTAW ST
NATIONAL
RECOVERY SP
PO BOX 330
REYNOLDS JAMES
W
1006 HIGHWAY 9A
APT 5
WYNN DELBERT F
1003 STATE LINE
RD
BOKOSHE
ANDERSON H D
ROUTE 1, BOX 51
CULWELL
PO BOX 11
CULWELL ROCKY
PO BOX 11
CAMERON
ARNDT JEFFERY D
16389 ROUTE LN
BLASDEL BRETT
12460 HILL TOWN
RD
CLARA E MCRAY
CLARA E
RR1 BOX 1020
RIMER KEVIN
PO BOX 313
FANSHAWE
ROBERTSON
EUGENE
GENERAL
DELIVERY
HEAVENER
BROWN GRACE F
RR 1
BURDEN MEGAN L
200 HIGHWAY 128
APT 13
BURNS ERMALENE
DELORA
305 BLACKWELL
ST
CRUZ MARIO
204 E AVENUE C
HAIRRELL EMIL
PO BOX 343
KNUDSEN CLINTON
504 W AVENUE E
LANDA NORA
204 W AVENUE E
NARANJO JUAN
50 E AVE D
PHIPPS CLINTON
47551 CAUGHERN
LN
ROSALES
MARGARITO
502 E AVE A
SABALA TETO
404 E AVENUE F
STRINGER WILM
201 DAILY ST
TILMON DORIS
29394 WELCH
LOOP
VINSON OLETTO
400 OLIVE ST
WHITE FAIRN
1214 TOWNSEND
RD
HOWE
AKERS DONALD
21950 NW
RAILROAD
AKERS KARICIA D
21950 WEST
NORTH RAILROAD
AKERS ROXANNA
21950 NW
RAILROAD
BINNS JAMES
19053 MOUNTAIN
VIEW RD
BLAYLOCK CODY S
PO BOX 4
FREDERICK JOSHUA
DEWAYNE
37977 LASSITER
RD
MILLER LEE
RT 1 BOX 1180
WILLIAMS JOHN
39635 MORRIS
CREEK RD
MONROE
REED EDNA E
PO BOX 455
MUSE
SWAIM WILL
121 EASTHARREL
DR STE 7
PANAMA
HARRIS JEREMY M
PO BOX 288
MAXIE JAMES SR
PO BOX 925
MCCLAIN H C
BOX 21
MORRISETTE
JENNIFER M
405 ROCK JAIL RD
APT A8
OLIVER HAROLD D
PO BOX 857
OSBORNE JENNIFER
L
PO BOX 1014
RAMER CARL D
GENERAL
DELIVERY
RODRIGUEZ TASHA
S
PO BOX 226
SIMS DENNIS
PO BOX 492
POCOLA
CHITTENDEN
RICHARD
707 SOUTH
STREET
DAHLEM THOMAS C
305 S OLIVER ST
DAVIS LOIS F
203 ROWE AVE
HARRISON HARRY
PO BOX 458
HAUTH REDITH
203 ROWE AVE
HOLMES BUBBIE
903 HOWARD ST
APT D
JOHNSON JR BILLY
R
1204 E PRYOR AVE
ODEN DAVID
PO BOX 219
PIVEC TONY
PO BOX 94
PROFFITT JENIFER
3201 RACE TRACK
RD 7
QUINALTY JOSH
100 CHELSEA LN
RICHARDSON
TAYLOR W
101 BRITTANY ST
RIOS ROBERT
1711 MONTANA
AVE
SCHNEIDER CARL
506 E STANDFIELD
AVE
SMITH MILDRED
PO BOX 706
SMITH MOLINE E
RR 1 BOX 377
WEAVER RICHARD
207 PARK LN
WEBB DAVID M
RR 3 BOX 395
POTEAU
ANDERSON RUBY
RT 1 36337
RIDGER RD
APODACA
STEPHANIE M
107 DEWEY AVE.,
APT #3
BARNES FLOYS O
2880 CENTRAL ST
BARNES RITA N
RR 1 BOX 127D
BOYD JILL
209 WARD AVE
BROUSSARD
KATRINA D
PO BOX 156
BROWN APRIL R
35000 PLEASANT
VALLEY ROAD
BUTTRESS KEITH D
RR 1 BOX 155
BUTTRESS MARSHA
RR 1 BOX 155
CAUGHERN JAMES
22943
ANGELWOOD DR
CLARK OLA V
1305 CENTRAL ST
COLLEY WHITNEY N
PO BOX 202
COLLINS JOE
209 WARD AVE
CONNER MARTIN
2880 CENTRAL ST
DILLINGHAM D A
206 PARKER AVE
DRURY KAY K
104 BURKLE AVE
ELDON DUGAN DBA
PO BOX 763
FORREST HILL
LANDSCAPING FBO
MICHAEL MIL
104 SOUTH BLVD
FRANCIS BELINDA G
107 CANYON RDG
GENEVIE LISA A
1803 CENTRAL ST
GLENN W SMITH
909 S CHURCH ST
HAMILTON WILLIAM
PO BOX 1198
HARRISON TURN
403 CONSER AVE
HERNANDEZ OSCAR
ALF
103 WINDHAM ST
JOBE ANITA
RT 1 BOX 117 B
JOBE ROBERT E JR
RT 1 BOX 117 B
KERBOW GEORGI
LEFLORE CO
AMBULANCE
LOGGAINS TROY
CENTRAL NAT
BANK
MIDGLEY LUCILLE A
606 S HARPER ST
MORPHIS DWAIN
LEE
37195 CEDAR LN
MORRIS ARIE H
601 MILLS AVE
MURRAY MICAH L
307 GATIE FRANK
DR
MYERS CURTIS
305 NORTH AVE
FRNT
PFIZER INC
COMPANY
106 MISSOURI AVE
QUALLS MORRIS
411 PARKER AVE
RELFORD JR BUD
PO BOX 965
SKINNER LUTHE
1016 GRADY AVE
SMITH LILLIE
15695 GAP CREEK
RD
SOUTHERN STAR
INC
C/O ATTN SARAH
DYER EXT 4491,
PO BOX 1362
TWIN EAGLE
MOTORS
3104 N.
BROADWAY
URCHISON CHARLA
203 MAIN ST
VASSAR HOYLE
411 PEARL ST
WANN MELISSA K.
20038 290TH ST
WOLF MICHAEL
33172 PLEASANT
VALLEY RD
SHADY POINT
EDWARDS ANDREW
L
24922 BRAZIL
CREEK LOOP
MCRAY IVAN
32203 CALHOUN
RD
TANKERSLEY
FOODSERVICE
3203 INDUSTRIAL
PARK RD
SPIRO
ARWOOD JESS N
617 SE 6TH ST
BATES GARY L
19318 EAGLES
LANE
CHRISTIAN JOHN P
603 SE 7TH ST
CHRISTIAN PEGGY
G
603 SE 7TH ST
DUNN EDDIE
101 HAMILTON CIR
ENNIS GREGORY
505 S BEECH ST
GRANT JOHN
17773 CARDINAL
LANE
HARRISON LINDA R
PO BOX 293
HAYNES LUCY
PO BOX 784
JEFFREY
ELIZABETHA
18562 179TH AVE
MAHAR STEVEN D
511 SE 4TH ST
MCCURTAIN LULA V
RT 2 BOX 338
MEADOWS M
113 N FRESNO ST
APT 14
MYERS SHARA
18575 DEATON
DRIVE
NELSON MICHAEL D
210 NE 6TH ST
SULLINS TYSON D
200 NW 9TH ST
TOBLER CHARLES
RR 2
ULRICH DALE A
22512 HILLDALE
CIR
ULRICH KELLY D
22512 HILLDALE
CIR
WILSON BRIAN
PO BOX 643
WORTON MEGGAN
A
17496 COWSHED
CROSSING RD
TALIHINA
BARNES JOHN L
12340 SE
HIGHWAY 63
BARNES PATSY N
12340 SE
HIGHWAY 63
BARNETT JAMES J
C/O MARGARET
WISE, 1 BOX 1006
CHOCTAW NATION
HLTH
1 CHOCTAW WAY,
PURCHASING
COMPTON JUDITH K
524 MAGNOLIA
FORREST NICK C
RT 1 BOX 1351
HATTON JOHN
405 SECOND ST
LINGENFELTER
PAUL
PO BOX 422
LONG MICHAEL D
RR 1 BOX 1349
MATTHISA GORDON
PO BOX 1168
PARKER MARK
19 SHENANDORH
DR
RICHARDSON
REBECCA
P.O. BOX 194
WISTER
BARNES RANDY
PO BOX 744
CAVANAL BIT AND
TOOL INC
PO BOX 849
COCKBURN BOBBY
26354 VAUGHN
LOOP
DAVIS JOSEPH D
45338
GHOSTBLUFF RD
GROVER RONALD
EARL JR
P O BOX 207
HAAG BRENDA
35882 PLEASANT
VALLEY RD
MEEH TANYA J
PO BOX 160
MEEH WILLIAM
PO BOX 734
MIDGLEY WILLIAM
26337 FRUIT FARM
RD
SMITH JIM
P O BOX 714
SYLVIA FERGUS
RR 2 BOX 90
L
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F
L
O
R
E
C
o
u
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t
y
4
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2

NOTICE OF PERSONS APPEARING
TO BE OWNERS OF ABANDONED PROPERTY
Got
unclaimed
property?
State Treasurer Ken Miller wants you to get
www.YOURMONEY.ok.gov
Please take a few minutes to see if your name is included on this list
of all new names to see if you have money waiting to be claimed.
LEFLORE COUNTY
STATE LAW REQUIRES that before information may be obtained concerning reported
unclaimed property, there must be a valid proven interest in the property. To allow the
Unclaimed Property Division to process your inquiry, please send a black & white copy
of your driver’s license and provide the following information.
Name of listed owner: ______________________________________
(Exactly as it appears in this publication)
SSN/FEI No. of Listed Owner: ________________________________
(Not Required but failure to do so might delay claim processing)
Your relationship to listed owner: ___________________________
(i.e., self, spouse, divorced, heir — son, daughter, grandson, etc.)
If listed owner is deceased, please check (✓) here: _________
Your name: ______________________________________________
(Attach a black & white copy of your driver’s license)
SSN/FEI No.: _____________________________________________
(Not Required but failure to do so might delay claim processing)
Current Address: __________________________________________
(If filing for a business give current business address.)
City:________________________ State: _________ Zip:___________
E-mail: __________________________________________________
Day time phone number: (__________) ________________________
Area code
_______________________________________ _____________
(Your Signature) (Date)
Our only goal is to reunite property with its true and lawful owner. Upon review
of your claim, the Unclaimed Property Division may ask for additional docu-
mentation. To save processing time, please attach to your claim copies of any
documentation that verifies your relationship to the listed owner.
A MESSAGE FROM
STATE TREASURER KEN MILLER
More than 825,000 Oklahomans do have unclaimed
property and we’d like to return it! Oklahoma
businesses bring unclaimed cash, rebates, paychecks,
royalties, stock and bonds to my office at the State
Capitol and it’s my job to return the money to the
owners and heirs.
Our service is always free and there is no time limit on
claiming your property! These are just the most recent
names we have received. Our online database contains
thousands of names dating back to 1967. If your name
is not on this list, check our website at:
www.yourmoney.ok.gov
If you find your name, start your claim online or use the form below.
ONLY NEW NAMES! If you find your name, fill out the form and mail it to
our office at the State Capitol, or you can start your claim on our website at
www.yourmoney.ok.gov. For any questions about unclaimed property, give
us a call at 405-521-4273.
NOTICE OF NAMES OF PERSONS
APPEARING TO BE OWNERS OF ABANDONED PROPERTY
The names and addresses contained in this notice are as they were reported by the holder.
Information concerning the the names and last-known addresses of the property holders
may be obtained by any person possessing an interest in the property by submitting an
online claim or addressing an inquiry to the Unclaimed Property Division. The property is in
the custody of the State Treasurer and all claims must be directed to the Unclaimed
Property Division. You may mail this form to:
Unclaimed Property Division • Oklahoma State Treasurer
2300 N. Lincoln Blvd., Rm. 217, Oklahoma City, OK 73105 • (405) 521-4273
By Justin Juozapacvicius
Associated Press
TULSA, (AP) — A Tulsa
police officer on Tuesday
pleaded not guilty to first-
degree murder in the off-
duty shooting death of his
daughter’s boyfriend.
Shannon Kepler, a
24-year-veteran police offi-
cer, was charged Monday in
the Aug. 5 death of 19-year-
old Jeremey Lake. The long-
time officer is also charged
with one count of shooting
with intent to kill because prosecutors
say he also shot at his daughter.
The court entered the plea at an
arraignment for Kepler and set a pre-
liminary hearing for Oct. 22.
His wife, Gina Kepler, was arrested in
the incident on a complaint of being an
accessory after the fact of murder but
she has not been charged because pros-
ecutors say they don’t have evidence to
support a charge.
Gina Kepler’s lawyer, Scott Troy, told
reporters as they left the arraignment
that she was “looking forward to her
husband’s exoneration.”
Shannon Kepler’s attorney, Richard
O’Carroll, provided a statement lam-
basting prosecutors for the charges, say-
ing “there is not one credible eyewitness
to this event.”
The Keplers “are solid folks” who
“did everything they knew to protect
their daughter,” O’Carroll said. The
daughter, Lisa Kepler, was among three
sisters whom the Keplers adopted from
a troubled home.
Prosecutor Steve Kunzweiler, the
chief of the criminal division, said later
Tuesday that it was “improper for any
attorney to try and litigate their case in
the media,” and said the
facts of the case spoke for
themselves.
After the shooting, Lisa
Kepler told a newspaper
that her parents had kicked
her out of their home and
taken her to a nearby
homeless shelter. The
Associated Press has been
unable to locate the daugh-
ter. She told the Tulsa World after Lake’s
death that she hoped her parents “rot in
prison.”
Shannon Kepler had been trying “to
protect his daughter, who preferred to
live in a high crime area than live in a
home with rules prohibiting her from
bringing men home at night, some of
whom even broke into the Kepler home,”
O’Carroll’s statement said.
“These people loved their daughter,”
O’Carroll added in brief remarks outside
the courtroom.
Officer pleads not guilty in 19-year-old’s death
Shannon Kepler Gina Kepler
Sens. Boozman,
Inhofe to attend
Arkansas hearing
FORT SMITH, Ark.
(AP) — U.S. Sens. John
Boozman of Arkansas and
Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma
are to attend a transporta-
tion hearing in Fort Smith.
The two Republicans are
to take part in the Regional
Intermodal Transportation
Authority hearing on
Tuesday in western
Arkansas.
Boozman and Inhofe are
members of the Senate
Environment and Public
Works Committee that has
jurisdiction over both the
U.S. Department of
Transportation and the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers.
The two agencies are
responsible for transporta-
tion infrastructure, includ-
ing interstates and naviga-
ble waterways.
The transportation
authority was created in
2009 by city officials in
Fort Smith and Van Buren
and county officials in
Crawford and Sebastian
counties to support improv-
ing the transportation infra-
structure in the region that
includes the Arkansas
River.
GUTHRIE, (AP) — The U.S. Geological Survey says
an earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 4.2 rattled
the Oklahoma City area Tuesday morning.
There are no immediate reports of injuries or damage.
The USGS says the quake was centered 4 miles south-
southwest of Guthrie, or about 24 miles north of Oklahoma
City.
Residents in the capital city reported feeling the quake
at about 7:40 a.m. Tuesday.
The USGS says the quake had a depth of 2.1 miles.
USGS: 4.2 magnitude
quake hits Oklahoma
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The co-founder of the
Sooner Tea Party is scheduled to be sentenced on felony
blackmail and computer crimes convictions.
Al Gerhart is scheduled to be sentenced Tuesday in
Oklahoma County District Court. Gerhart faced up to five
years in prison on each count, but the 12-member jury
that convicted him in May recommended that he not
serve any prison time and pay a $1,000 fine.
Gerhart was accused of sending a politically charged
email to a state senator who testified he felt threatened by
its tone. The March 2013 email warned Sen. Cliff Branan
that if he didn’t take up a bill favored by Gerhart’s politi-
cal group, that Gerhart would make sure he regretted that
decision.
Defense attorneys argued the email was political
speech protected by the First Amendment.
Sentencing
scheduled for
Oklahoma tea
party founder
Have you checked the Poteau Daily
News website lately?
In addition to current weather and
news of all kinds, there are videos
of local events.
Check it out!
www.poteaudailynews.com
Leflore School wel-
comes several new employ-
ees for the 2014-15 aca-
demic year.
They include Diana War-
ren, Marla Warren, Mark
Warren, Suzanne Brennan,
Misti Roath, Katie McKin-
ney, Sheila Brown and Billy
Gwin.
Diana Warren and her
husband Casey live in
Leflore and have been
married for 45 years. They
have raised three sons and
have seven grandchildren,
three in college and four
enrolled at Leflore. Diana
Warren received her Bach-
elor of Science in Educa-
tion July 1980 and Master
of Education May 1984
from Northeastern State
University. Diana Warren
has been an educator for
34 years and retired in May
2014. She has chosen to
return to Leflore to teach
kindergarten and said she
is excited and looking for-
ward to a successful year
being part of a team that
makes positive differences
in children’s lives.
Marla Warren and her
husband Bryan live in
Leflore and have been mar-
ried for 20 years. They have
two girls: Bryanna, who is
in her second year at Carl
Albert State College, and
Ayme, who is a sophomore
at Leflore High School.
Marla Warren has worked
in education for 11 years.
She received her associate
degree from Eastern Okla-
homa State College in 2003
and bachelor’s degree from
Northeastern State Univer-
sity in December. Marla
said she looks forward to
working with and watching
children learn and grow at
Leflore School.
Mark Warren and his
wife Jessica live in Sum-
merfield and have been
married for 24 years. They
have five children: Scoute,
who is attending Southeast-
ern Oklahoma State Uni-
versity, Logan, who is
attending Carl Albert State
College, Mason and Daw-
son, sophomores, and Piper,
second grade at Leflore.
Mark Warren received his
bachelor’s in education
from Southeastern Oklaho-
ma State University May
1992. He has taught for 22
years and said he is looking
forward to a successful
year. Mark Warren will be
teaching junior high and
high school history and
boys athletics.
Suzanne Brennan has
lived in Poteau for the last
14 years. She graduated
from Whitesboro High
School, Eastern Oklahoma
State College and Rogers
State University. She is
married to Tom Brennan
and has three children,
Madeline, Olivia and Jim.
Brennan previously worked
at Poteau United Methodist
Church Preschool. She said
she is very excited to be
teaching at Leflore and
looks forward to getting to
know the students, faculty
and staff better.
Misti Roath is a 2000
graduate of Leflore School.
She received her bachelor’s
and master’s degrees from
East Central University.
Roath has nine years of
teaching experience and
will be the special educa-
tion and high school coun-
selor. Roath and her hus-
band, Jason, have two
daughters, KayLee, a
junior, and Kloee, a fifth-
grader.
Katie McKinney has
lived in the area all her life.
She has worked in the edu-
cational system for the past
12 years. McKinney has
one son, Ian, who attends
Heavener High School. She
will be driving the bus and
keeping classrooms pre-
sentable. McKinney is a
U.S. Army veteran.
Sheila Brown resides in
Poteau with her husband
Jimmy, Hannah, and Kenzi,
along with daughter Brooke
and son-in-law Paul. Brown
has two grandchildren, Joel
and Jenna.
She retired after teach-
ing 27 years in elementary
at Cameron. She will be
teaching K-3 reading inter-
vention this year.
Billy Gwin has lived in
Leflore for many years. As
a past employee, he is
rejoining the staff as a bus
driver.
No news organization
on Earth or any other
planet covers
LeFlore County news
better than we do.
PAGE 16 . . . WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2014
Education
POTEAU DAILY NEWS
D
i
d
Y
ou Kn
o
w
?
You can safely dispose of your unused or expired prescription
medications 24/7 at the following locations:
LeFlore County Sheriff’s Offce
100 S. Broadway, Poteau • 918-647-2317
Poteau Police Department
110 Peters St, Poteau • 918-647-8620
Arkoma Police Department
1103 Main Street, Arkoma 918-875-3381
McCurtain County Sheriff’s Offce
200 N-Central, Idabel • 580-286-3331
Choctaw County Sheriff’s Offce
305 E. Jefferson, Hugo • 580-326-2000
Pushmataha County Sheriff’s Offce
207 W. 3
rd
St, Antlers 580-298-2475
This service announcement is provided by: LeFlore County Coalition for Healthy Living, Health in the Valley Coalition, and SOIC Region 6
Regional Prevention Coordinators (RPC),Local Law Enforcement, Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics (OBN), in partnership with ODMHSAS and
SAMHSA
Gene’s Satellite Service
918-649-1069
We Have
Moved!
Come See Us At Our New Location!
2706 N. Broadway, next to Doc Stone
Diana Warren Marla Warren Mark Warren Suzanne Brennan Misti Roath Katie McKinney Sheila Brown
Leflore welcomes new faces, new look
John Long, superintendent of LeFlore Public School, says the newly renovated
high school building is ready for the new year. “Due to the support of our
community in passing our latest school bond, much needed improvements were
made to the high school building, including a new roof, windows, ceiling, floors,
bathrooms and handicap access to both entrances of the building. LPS continues
to improve their facilities to provide each student with greater educational
success,” Long said.
Photo submitted
Janet Smith
named to RSU
Honor Roll
Janet K. Smith of Poteau
has been named to the
Dean’s Honor Roll for the
summer 2014 semester at
Rogers State University in
Claremore.
To qualify for the Dean’s
Honor Roll, students must
complete a minimum of six
semester hours of college-
level courses with a 3.5
grade point average (no
grades lower than a “B”).
JENNIFER LEANNE BROWN
Scholarship: General
Scholarship Fund.
Parent/Guardian: Lori
and Charles Grant.
High School: Sallisaw.
Major: Nursing.
Activities, Honors: Carl
Albert Scholar’s program.
Hobbies and Interests:
Drawing, spending time
with family and friends
and attending church at
Oakridge Assembly.
This document is © 2014 by editor - all rights reserved.
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